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Technology brings iconic ship to classroom shores

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Posted October 28, 2015

Students from around Australia are now able to take a tour of the iconic ship, the HMB Endeavour, without leaving school, thanks to a new digital technology.

Students take a virtual tour of the Endeavour

CSIRO has worked with the Australian National Maritime Museum (ANMM) to give more Australian students access to the iconic HMB Endeavour using virtual tours.

The historically and scientifically significant vessel moored on Darling Harbour is a replica of the ship that Captain James Cook and famous botanist Joseph Banks sailed to Australia almost 250 years ago.

The ship is visited by over 35,000 school kids each year, but not everyone has the chance to visit the ship in person.

This new technology enables students from all across the country and around the world to experience the HBM Endeavour remotely.

Students can tour below deck on the HMB Endeavour to see what life was like for the sailors on board.

Students can tour below deck on the HMB Endeavour to see what life was like for the sailors on board.

CSIRO developed a way to bring the ship to the classroom to teach kids about science. Lessons include investigating the mechanics of pulley systems, how food was stored onboard and the specimens that Joseph Banks collected on his journey.

The ship has been fitted with live-streaming panoramic cameras so that students can look around the ship as if they were really there.

A museum educator uses a tablet computer to guide the students around the HMB Endeavour and communicate with them along the way.

“The students can look around like they would if they were actually onboard while at the same time hearing and talking to the educator,” said CSIRO Principal Experimental Scientist Gavin Walker.

 The HMB Endeavour replica at sea Download image The HMB Endeavour replica at sea © John Lancaster

The HMB Endeavour replica at sea Download image
The HMB Endeavour replica at sea
© John Lancaster

ANMM educator Anne Doran said that the interactivity of the digital excursion makes it a much more engaging experience for students.

“Being able to ask them questions and have immediate feedback shows that they are listening and answering questions straight away in real time demonstrates that students are engaged in the lesson,” Ms Doran said.

“Being a national museum it’s fabulous that we are now able to share this wonderful ship with students from all around Australia,” she said.

With funding from the Australian Government through the Department of Communications, CSIRO was able to use its technological expertise to bring the HMB Endeavour to life for more Australian students.

Source: CSIRO

 

 

 

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