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Cane toads potentially lucrative export in cancer fight

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Posted March 25, 2015

Wait before you whack that toad. Not only is it frowned upon to kill cane toads inhumanely, but the amphibian’s venom could be worth a bucket-load.

That’s the message from The University of Queensland School of Pharmacy’s Dr Harendra Parekh, who is exploring how cane toad venom can be used to fight cancer.

“People are killing cane toads by the millions for free, but it’s potentially a very lucrative export market for Australia with the Chinese being extremely interested in naturally derived health products,” Dr Parekh said.

“The Australian cane toad is very similar to the Asiatic toad, whose venom has been used in Chinese medicine for thousands of years.

“We already have several companies interested, as the Chinese value Australian toads because of the environment they enjoy here.”

Dr Jing Jing, former PhD student at UQ discovered that cane toad poison could kill cancerous prostate cells while sparing healthy cells.

“However, before we can take it to market, we need to improve the venom’s solubility (ability to dissolve) − which we are well on the way to achieving,” Dr Jing said.

“Investigating applications for other cancers is also firmly on our radar.”

Source: University of Queensland

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