Google Play icon

Speciation of radioactive particles in Fukushima soil

Share
Posted December 12, 2014

Radioactive contamination of the soil in the Fukushima area as a result of the Fukushima nuclear disaster is one of the most serious problems in Japan but it was still uncertain what kinds of materials actually bind the radioactive cesium nuclides which are responsible for the radiation. Due to such uncertainty, research and development of effective actions for decontamination have not progressed.

Electron microscopic images of the typical radioactive particles (top) and X-ray spectra from the particles (bottom) indicating their chemical compositions. These particles have been identified as (left) weathered biotite, (center) a composite of organic matter and fine minerals and (right) an aggregate of fine minerals. © 2014 Kogure Laboratory.

Electron microscopic images of the typical radioactive particles (top) and X-ray spectra from the particles (bottom) indicating their chemical compositions. These particles have been identified as (left) weathered biotite, (center) a composite of organic matter and fine minerals and (right) an aggregate of fine minerals. © 2014 Kogure Laboratory.

Associate Professor Kogure’s laboratory in the Graduate School of Science, the University of Tokyo and researchers in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), and the Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS) have successfully identified the cesium-fixing fine particles in soil samples from Iitate, Fukushima, and determined the distribution of the radiation in these particles, mainly using a variety of electron microscopic techniques.

This research result will make a great contribution, for example, to prediction of the long-term future spread and movement of radioactive materials, finding the new recipes for soil decontamination, and the development of compaction and/or storage methods of the large amounts of waste produced by the decontamination process in the Fukushima area.

Source: University of Tokyo

Featured news from related categories:

Technology Org App
Google Play icon
84,082 science & technology articles

Most Popular Articles

  1. Efficiency of solar panels could be improved without changing them at all (September 2, 2019)
  2. Diesel is saved? Volkswagen found a way to reduce NOx emissions by 80% (September 3, 2019)
  3. The famous old Titanic is disappearing into time - a new expedition observed the corrosion (September 2, 2019)
  4. The Time Is Now for Precision Patient Monitoring (July 3, 2019)
  5. Europe and US are Going to Try and Deflect an Asteroid (September 6, 2019)

Follow us

Facebook   Twitter   Pinterest   Tumblr   RSS   Newsletter via Email