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Viking families traveled together, research shows

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Posted December 10, 2014

A new study shows that when Vikings moved to new territories, men and women traveled together. Erika Hagelberg of the University of Oslo and her colleagues compared ancient Norse and Icelandic mitochondrial DNA with mitochondrial DNA of modern Northwestern Europeans. They found similarities between the ancient and modern DNA suggesting women played a significant role in Viking migrations. The research appears in The Royal Society Philosophical Transactions B.

Vikings

The “Lofotr” viking ship and the smaller “femkeiping”. Both recosntructions based on excavations from the Gokstad find. Credit: Geir Are Johansen/Wikipedia

Vikings traveled long distances, establishing colonies in Iceland and many parts of Northwestern Europe. They even traveled as far as North America. It’s a commonly held belief that Viking expeditions consisted entirely of men, and that a shortage of women at home compelled Viking men to seek out women in foreign lands. Earlier genetic studies have suggested that while Viking men ventured forth to pillage and plunder, women and children stayed home. Viking women did not rejoin their men until after the men had already settled in new territories.

Read more at: Phys.org

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