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Wading through the swamp to measure top quark mass

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Posted December 8, 2014
This news or article is intended for readers with certain scientific or professional knowledge in the field.

Even after the discovery of the Higgs boson, the top quark is still a focus of attention because of its peculiar position of being the heaviest quark in the Standard Model and for its possible role in physics beyond the Standard Model.

The black dots plot the distribution of the reconstructed top mass for events containing one or more b-tags. The distribution is compared to the expected yield for background and signal events, normalized to the best fit.

The black dots plot the distribution of the reconstructed top mass for events containing one or more b-tags. The distribution is compared to the expected yield for background and signal events, normalized to the best fit.

If the Standard Model is correct, the stability of the vacuum strongly depends on the mass of the Higgs boson and the top quark mass. In this context, scientists favor the scenario that the universe is in a metastable state. A precision measurement of the top quark mass helps to better determine the relative stability of that state in this scenario.

At the Tevatron, top quarks were produced, mostly in pairs, only once in about 10 billion collisions. They decayed right away into a W boson and a bquark. In the most abundant and yet most challenging scenario, the final state contains six collimated sprays of particles, called jets, two of which likely originated from the b quarks, with peculiar, identifiable characteristics (allowing them to be “b-tagged”). This decay mode is usually called the all-hadronic channel, for which the signal is swamped by a background associated to the production of uninteresting multijet events, which were about a factor of 1,000 more abundant than the signal events.

This new analysis uses the full CDF Run II data set.
The set contains nearly twice the number of top quark pairs as seen in our previous measurement. The analysis uses an improved simulation and relies on there being at least one b-tagged jet. An important part of the analysis is to minimize the uncertainty in our measurement of jet scale energies. Exploiting the expected behavior of top-antitop signal events, the huge background can be tamed through finely tuned requirements, yielding about 4,000 events, where about one event out of three is expected from the signal. The all-hadronic final state can then be fully reconstructed using the energies of the six jets, and the mass of the top quark can be derived comparing the data to simulations produced for different input values of the top quark mass (see the above figure).

This procedure yields a value of 175.1 ± 1.2 (stat) ± 1.6 (sys) GeV/c2 for the top quark mass, with a 1 percent relative precision. This measurement complements the results obtained by CDF in other channels. Our measurement is consistent with thecurrent world average (which includes our previous measurement in the all-hadronic channel), obtained from measurements by ATLAS, CDF, CMS and DZero. The top quark mass world average is 173.3 ± 0.8 GeV/c2.

Source: FNAL

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