Google Play icon

Mars Orbiter’s Spectrometer Shows Oort Comet’s Coma

Share
Posted October 27, 2014

The Compact Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) observed comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring as the comet sped close to Mars on Oct. 19. CRISM recorded imaging data in 107 different wavelengths, showing the inner part of the cloud of dust, called the coma, surrounding the comet’s nucleus.

These two infrared images of comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring were taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) aboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on Oct. 19, 2014. This Oort Cloud comet was making its first voyage through the inner solar system. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/JHUAPL

These two infrared images of comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring were taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) aboard NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on Oct. 19, 2014. This Oort Cloud comet was making its first voyage through the inner solar system. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/JHUAPL

Two images from CRISM presenting three of the recorded wavelengths are online at this page.

Comet Siding Spring — an Oort Cloud comet that may contain material from the formation of the solar system some 4.6 billion years ago — was making its first voyage through the inner solar system. CRISM and many other instruments and spacecraft combined forces to provide an unprecedented data set for an Oort Cloud comet.

The appearance of color variations in the CRISM observations of the inner coma could be due to the properties of the comet’s dust, possibly dust grain size or composition. The full spectra will be analyzed to better understand the reason for the color variations.

Source: NASA

Featured news from related categories:

Technology Org App
Google Play icon
86,841 science & technology articles