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Microbes engineered for the direct conversion of biomass to ethanol fuel

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Posted June 3, 2014
New UGA research engineers microbes for the direct conversion of biomass to fuel
Janet Westpheling, a professor in the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences Department of Genetics. Credit: Alan Flurry/UGA

The promise of affordable transportation fuels from biomass—a sustainable, carbon neutral route to American energy independence—has been left perpetually on hold by the economics of the conversion process. New research from the University of Georgia has overcome this hurdle allowing the direct conversion of switchgrass to fuel.

 

The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, documents the direct conversion of  to biofuel without pre-treatment, using the engineered bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor bescii.

Pre-treatment of the biomass feedstock—non-food crops such as switchgrass and miscanthus—is the step of breaking down  before fermentation into. This pre-treatment step has long been the economic bottleneck hindering fuel production from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks.

Janet Westpheling, a professor in the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences Department of Genetics, and her team of researchers—all members of U.S. Department of Energy-funded BioEnergy Science Center in which UGA is a key partner—succeeded in genetically engineering the organism C. bescii to deconstruct un-pretreated plant biomass.

Read more at: Phys.org

 

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