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Chemical vapor deposition used to grow atomic layer materials on top of each other

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Posted April 17, 2014
Chemical vapor deposition used to grow atomic layer materials on top of each other
Cross-sectional HRTEM of Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2) /epitaxial graphene demonstrating the nucleation and subsequent lateral growth of MoS2 on a SiC step edge covered with epitaxial graphene. Credit: Yu-Chuan Lin
 

Researchers at Penn State’s Center for Two-Dimensional and Layered Materials and the University of Texas at Dallas have shown the ability to grow high quality, single-layer materials one on top of the other using chemical vapor deposition. This highly scalable technique, often used in the semiconductor industry, can produce new materials with unique properties that could be applied to solar cells, ultracapacitors for energy storage, or advanced transistors for energy efficient electronics, among many other applications.

“People have been trying to stack these layered materials using the scotch tape method (an exfoliation method developed by Nobel laureates Novoselov and Geim to produce graphene), but that leaves residue on the layers and is not scalable,” explains Joshua Robinson of Penn State, corresponding author on a recent article published online in ACS Nano. Other groups have utilized the chemical vapor deposition method to grow layered materials on a copper substrate, but this method requires some sophisticated techniques to transfer the layered material to a more functional substrate without causing tears or contamination.

Robinson and his colleagues employed a more direct method, using chemical vapor deposition to grow a layer of quasi-free-standing epitaxial graphene (QFEG) on a silicon carbide substrate, followed by a layer of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), a metal dichalcogenide compound widely used as a lubricant.

Read more at: Phys.org

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