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Scientists open a new window into quantum physics with superconductivity in LEDs

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Posted March 20, 2014
Scientists open a new window into quantum physics with superconductivity in LEDs
This image shows Alex Hayat (foreground) in lab. Credit: NSERC
A team of University of Toronto physicists led by Alex Hayat has proposed a novel and efficient way to leverage the strange quantum physics phenomenon known as entanglement. The approach would involve combining light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with a superconductor to generate entangled photons and could open up a rich spectrum of new physics as well as devices for quantum technologies, including quantum computers and quantum communication.

Entanglement occurs when particles become correlated in pairs to predictably interact with each other regardless of how far apart they are. Measure the properties of one member of the entangled pair and you instantly know the properties of the other. It is one of the most perplexing aspects of quantum mechanics, leading Einstein to call it “spooky action at a distance.”

“A usual light source such as an LED emits photons randomly without any correlations,” explains Hayat, who is also a Global Scholar at the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research. “We’ve proved that generating entanglement between photons emitted from an LED can be achieved by adding another peculiar physical effect of superconductivity – a resistance-free electrical current in certain materials at low temperatures.”

Read more at: Phys.org

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