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Smithsonian scientists solve ‘sudden death at sea’ mystery

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Posted February 26, 2014
Smithsonian scientists solve 'sudden death at sea' mystery
In this photo, Chilean and Smithsonian paleontologists study several fossil whale skeletons at Cerro Ballena next to the Pan-American Highway in the Atacama Region of Chile in 2011. Credit: Adam Metallo/Smithsonian Institution
Mass strandings of whales have puzzled people since Aristotle. Modern-day strandings can be investigated and their causes, often human-related, identified. Events that happened millions of years ago, however, are far harder to analyze—frequently leaving their cause a mystery. A team of Smithsonian and Chilean scientists examined a large fossil site of ancient marine mammal skeletons in the Atacama Desert of Northern Chile—the first definitive example of repeated mass strandings of marine mammals in the fossil record. The site reflected four distinct strandings over time, indicating a repeated and similar cause: toxic algae. The team’s findings will be published Feb. 26 in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

The site was first discovered during an expansion project of the Pan-American Highway in 2010. The following year, paleontologists from the Smithsonian and Chile examined the fossils, dating 6-9 million years ago, and recorded what remained before the site was paved over.

The team documented the remains of 10 kinds of marine vertebrates from the site, named Cerro Ballena—Spanish for “whale hill.”

Read more at: Phys.org

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