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First shark killed in Australia cull

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Posted January 27, 2014
Deadly attacks are rare in Australia, with only one in every 15 incidents a year typically proving fatal
Deadly attacks are rare in Australia, with only one in every 15 incidents a year typically proving fatal
The first shark caught under a controversial new Australian culling policy aimed at reducing fatal attacks was shot dead Sunday after being snared, angering conservationists.

The three-metre (10-feet) creature, reported to be a female tiger shark, was caught on bait lines set off Australia’s west coast in the past 24 hours under a policy approved by the national government.

A fisherman contracted to patrol the lines found the shark snared off Meelup Beach early Sunday and, according to media reports, shot it in the head four times at close range.

Western Australia state premier Colin Barnett was heckled by a protester at a public function after the kill was made public but was unapologetic about the plan, which has been met with criticism and demonstrations.

“I get no pleasure out of seeing sharks killed but I have an overriding responsibility to protect the people of Western Australia,” Barnett told reporters.

“When you have sharks that are three, four, five metres long of known aggressive varieties, swimming in the water very close to beachgoers, that is an imminent danger.”

Read more at: Phys.org

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