Google Play icon

Study challenges long-held hypothesis that iron promotes atherosclerosis

Share
Posted December 18, 2013
UCLA study challenges long-held hypothesis that iron promotes atherosclerosis
Even though researchers increased the amount of iron in macrophages of mice, there was no effect on the progression of atherosclerosis. The magnified images show a high level of iron (blue stain) in macrophages of two types of mice (called APOE and APOE – FFE) used in the study. Credit: UCLA/Cell Reports
A UCLA research team has found no evidence of an association between iron levels in the body and the risk of atherosclerosis, the hardening and narrowing of the arteries that leads to cardiovascular disease, the No. 1 killer in the U.S.

The discovery, based on a comprehensive study in a mouse model of atherosclerosis, contradicts a long-held hypothesis about the role of iron in the disease and carries important implications for patients with chronic kidney disease or anemia related to inflammatory disorders, many of whom receive high-dose iron supplementation therapy. The findings currently appear online in the peer-reviewed journal Cell Reports.

“Understanding risk factors for atherosclerosis progression is important for better prevention and treatment of the disease,” said senior author Elizabeta Nemeth, a professor of medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and co-director of the UCLA Center for Iron Disorders. “For many years, there has been a belief that higher iron levels might contribute to, or worsen, atherosclerosis. We found no such connection.”

Read more at: MedicalXpress

Featured news from related categories:

Technology Org App
Google Play icon
86,845 science & technology articles