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Stomach ‘clock’ tells us how much to eat

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Posted December 5, 2013
Food
University of Adelaide researchers have discovered the first evidence that the nerves in the stomach act as a circadian clock, limiting food intake to specific times of the day.

The discovery, published today in The Journal of Neuroscience, could lead to new information about how the gut signals to our brains about when we’re full, and when to keep eating.

In the University’s Nerve-Gut Research Laboratory, Dr Stephen Kentish investigated how the nerves in the stomach respond to stretch, which occurs as a consequence of food intake, at three-hourly intervals across one day.

“These nerves are responsible for letting the brain know how much food we have eaten and when to stop eating,” says Dr Kentish, who is the lead author of the paper.

“What we’ve found is that the nerves in the gut are at their least sensitive at time periods associated with being awake. This means more food can be consumed before we feel full at times of high activity, when more energy is required.

Read more at: MedicalXpress

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