Google Play icon

Monkeys ‘understand’ rules underlying language musicality

Share
Posted November 14, 2013
Monkeys 'understand' rules underlying language musicality
This is a Squirrel monkey/Saimiri sciureus. Credit: Photo: M. Böckle
Many of us have mixed feelings when remembering painful lessons in German or Latin grammar in school. Languages feature a large number of complex rules and patterns: using them correctly makes the difference between something which “sounds good”, and something which does not. However, cognitive biologists at the University of Vienna have shown that sensitivity to very simple structural and melodic patterns does not require much learning, or even being human: South American squirrel monkeys can do it, too.

Language and music are structured systems, featuring particular relationships between syllables, words and musical notes. For instance, implicit knowledge of the musical and grammatical patterns of our language makes us notice right away whether a speaker is native or not. Similarly, the perceived musicality of some languages results from dependency relations between vowels within a word. In Turkish, for example, the last syllable in words like “kaplanlar” or “güller” must “harmonize” with the previous vowels. (Try it yourself: “güllar” requires more movement and does not sound as good as “güller”.)

Similar “dependencies” between words, syllables or musical notes can be found in languages and musical cultures around the world. The biological question is whether the ability to process dependencies evolved in human cognition along with human language, or is rather a more general skill, also present in other animal species who lack language.

Read more at: Phys.org

Featured news from related categories:

Technology Org App
Google Play icon
86,998 science & technology articles

Most Popular Articles

  1. You Might Not Need a Hybrid Car If This Invention Works (January 11, 2020)
  2. Toyota Raize a new cool compact SUV that we will not see in this part of the world (November 24, 2019)
  3. An 18 carat gold nugget made of plastic (January 13, 2020)
  4. Human body temperature has decreased in United States, study finds (January 10, 2020)
  5. Donkeys actually prefer living in hot climate zones (January 6, 2020)

Follow us

Facebook   Twitter   Pinterest   Tumblr   RSS   Newsletter via Email