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Brain differences seen in social butterflies

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Posted November 13, 2013
Brain differences seen in social butterflies
Small study found three regions were larger, more connected than they were in more isolated people.
A small new study suggests that parts of your brain may differ depending on whether you’re a social butterfly or a lone wolf.

The research is preliminary, but it could lead the way to more insight into how humans—and other primates—interact with others.

“The big message is that your brain is reflecting your current social environment, and your social skills at a wider level. The brain is flexible and reflecting all of these behaviors,” said study author Maryann Noonan, a postdoctoral researcher at Oxford University, who worked on the study while at the Montreal Neurological Institute.

There’s also the question of which comes first. Is the brain pre-programmed to turn certain people into more social creatures? Or does your brain change as a result of whether you’re willing to engage with lots of other people in your life?

At issue is the connection between your brain and your ability to socialize with others of your species.

Read more at: MedicalXpress

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