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Is DNA from mom or dad? New technique will accelerate personalized medicine

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Posted November 4, 2013

A new technique successfully takes on a longstanding challenge in DNA sequencing – determining whether a particular genetic sequence comes from an individual’s mother or father. The method, described in a Ludwig Cancer Research study in Nature Biotechnology, promises to accelerate studies of how genes contribute to disease, improve the process of matching donors with organs and help scientists better understand human migration patterns.

“The technique will enable clinicians to better assess a person’s individual risk for disease. It is potentially transformative for personalized medicine,” says Bing Ren, Ludwig scientist at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, who led the research on the new technique, called “HaploSeq.”

“Current sequencing technologies are fast and rapidly getting cheaper – an individual’s genome can now be sequenced in about a week for $5,000,” says Ren. “In the not too distant future, everyone’s genome will be sequenced. That will become the standard of care.” But, he explains, “There has been a problem with this scenario.” Except for the sex chromosomes, everyone has two copies of each chromosome. One copy comes from mom, and the other from dad. Current techniques cannot distinguish between the two copies of each gene and, therefore, are not very good at determining whether particular genetic differences, such as a single-letter change in the DNA, originate with an individual’s mother or father – muddying genetic analyses.

Read more at: MedicalXpress

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