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Review: $279 Chromebook good as secondary computer

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Posted October 9, 2013
Hewlett-Packard’s new Chromebook 11 is a laptop at heart, but it’s light and portable enough to work well in places where you’d normally prefer a tablet.

 
Review: $279 Chromebook good as secondary computer
The new HP Chromebook 11, left, is displayed with a Chromebook 14 at a Google event, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2013 in New York. The new $279 laptop, based on Google’s Internet-centric Chrome operating system, borrows many of the high-end features found in a model that costs about $1,000 more. The new laptop has a plastic frame with no sharp edges or corners, or even screw holes. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
 

I’m thinking cramped buses and airplanes, the waiting area of a doctor’s office or even the cushiony couch in your living room. The Chromebook is small enough to rest comfortably on your lap and easy to carry when you need to pick up and go.

The drawback is it relies heavily on the Internet to run various services, so you’ll need to plan ahead if you’re looking to write that great masterpiece without access to Wi-Fi. That’s because the Chromebook doesn’t run Windows or Mac OS, like the majority of laptops. Rather, it uses Google’s Chrome OS system, which needs a steady Internet connection.

Although it’s possible to use apps while offline, Chromebooks are really designed for online use. Many apps don’t work fully—or at all—without the Internet connection, or they need to be configured while you still have the connection to work offline. It’s not as simple as installing a program and expecting it to work wherever you are. In addition, Chromebooks have little storage on the devices; Google steers you toward its online storage service, Drive, for your documents, photos, music and movies.

Read more at: Phys.org

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