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Pan-cancer studies find common patterns shared by different tumor types

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Posted September 27, 2013

Cancer encompasses a complex group of diseases traditionally defined by where in the body it originates, as in lung cancer or colon cancer. This framework for studying and treating cancer has made sense for generations, but molecular analysis now shows that cancers of different organs have many shared features, while cancers from the same organ or tissue are often quite distinct.

The Pan-Cancer Initiative, a major effort to analyze the molecular aberrations in cancer cells across a range of tumor types, has yielded an abundance of new findings reported in 18 forthcoming papers, including four published in the October issue of Nature Genetics. The initiative, launched in October 2012 at a meeting in Santa Cruz, California, is part of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project led by the National Cancer Institute and the National Human Genome Research Institute.

Josh Stuart, an associate professor of biomolecular engineering at the University of California, Santa Cruz, helped organize the Pan-Cancer Initiative and is lead author of a commentary in Nature Genetics giving an overview of the project and its initial findings.

“For years we’ve been looking at one tumor type at a time, but there are patterns you can only spot by making connections across different tissues and tumor types. Finding these similarities across tissues can have important implications for treatment,” Stuart said.

 

Read more at: MedicalXpress

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