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Exploring Google Glass through eyes of early users

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Posted August 28, 2013
Exploring Google Glass through eyes of early users

Exploring Google Glass through eyes of early users
In this Wednesday, May 29, 2013 file photo, Sarah Hill, a Google Glass contest winner, of Columbia, Mo., tries out the device, in New York. “This is like having the Internet in your eye socket,” Hill said. “But it’s less intrusive than I thought it would be. I can totally see how this would still let you still be in the moment with the people around you.” (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

Geeks aren’t the only people wearing Google Glass. Among the people testing Google Inc.’s wearable computer are teachers, dentists, doctors, hair stylists, architects, athletes and even a zookeeper.

Some 10,000 people are trying out an early version of Glass, most of them selected as part of a contest.

The Associated Press spoke to Glass owners who have been using the device: Sarah Hill, a former TV broadcaster and current military veterans advocate, and Deborah Lee, a stay-at-home mom.

Glass is designed to work like a smartphone that’s worn like a pair of glasses. Although it looks like a prop from a science fiction movie, the device is capturing imaginations beyond the realm of nerds.

The trio’s favorite feature, by far, is the hands-free camera that shoots photos and video through voice commands. (Images can also be captured by pressing a small button along the top of the right frame of Glass.) They also like being able to connect to the Internet simply by tapping on the right frame of Glass to turn it on and then swiping along the same side to scroll through a menu. That menu allows them to do such things as get directions on Google’s map or find a piece of information through Google’s search engine. The information is shown on a thumbnail-sized transparent screen attached just above the right eye to stay out of a user’s field of vision.

Among the biggest shortcomings they cited was Glass’ short battery life, especially if a lot of video is being taken. Although Google says Glass should last for an entire day on a single battery charge for the typical user, Hill said there were times when she ran out of power after 90 minutes to two hours during periods when she was recording a lot of video.

Read more at: Phys.org

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