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Well-being not a priority for workaholics, researcher says

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Posted August 23, 2013

Working overtime may cost you your health, according to a Kansas State University doctoral researcher.

Sarah Asebedo, doctoral student in personal financial planning and conflict resolution, Edina, Minn., conducted a study using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. She and her colleagues—Sonya Britt, assistant professor of family studies and human services and director of the university’s personal financial planning program, and Jamie Blue, doctoral student in personal financial planning, Tallahassee, Fla.—found a preliminary link between workaholics and reduced physical and mental well-being. The study, “Workaholism and Well-Being,” will appear in Financial Services Review, a journal of individual financial management.

“We looked at the association between workaholism and physical and mental well-being,” Asebedo said. “We found workaholics—defined by those working more than 50 hours per week—were more likely to have reduced physical well-being, measured by skipped meals. Also, we found that workaholism was associated with reduced mental well-being as measured by a self-reported depression score.”

The link between workaholism and well-being has been assumed for years; however, there was a lack of research supporting the link until this study, Asebedo said. To understand why people work overtime even when they know it is not good for their well-being, the researchers used Gary S. Becker’s Theory of the Allocation of Time, a mathematical analysis for choice measuring the cost of time.

 

Read more at: Phys.org

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