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Study offers insight into Saharan dust migration

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Posted August 23, 2013
Sahara

Sahara
Luca Galuzzi / Wikipedia

Satellite pictures of Saharan dust clouds have been in the news all summer, but to Shankar Chellam, they have just raised more questions.

How much impact did the Saharan dust have on Houston’s air? Is it more toxic than our home-grown dust?

Chellam, a professor in the department of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Houston’s Cullen College of Engineering, is searching for answers to those and other questions.

Clouds of African dust often migrate across the Atlantic Ocean during summer months, affecting Houston’s air quality from mid-June through mid-September. Chellam said it’s especially prevalent in late August and early September.

The dust, whipped up by sandstorms in northwest Africa and carried by trade winds across the Atlantic Ocean, takes about 10 days to two weeks to reach the United States and, ultimately, Houston.

Chellam said he collaborates on the project with Joseph Prospero, professor emeritus of marine and atmospheric chemistry at the University of Miami.

Chellam became interested after he noticed “the most curious coincidence” as he was collecting data on industrial air pollution outside plants along the Houston Ship Channel in 2008.

He began the project expecting that the plants would emit a constant amount of pollution, as measured from just beyond their property lines. But he discovered that on some days they emitted relatively little, while emissions were much higher on other days.

 

Read more at: Phys.org

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