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Computer scientists develop new model to simulate cloth on a computer with unprecedented accuracy

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Posted August 13, 2013
From left to right are: Silk crepe de chine, linen plain, silk shot fabric, velvet and polyester satin charmeuse. At the far right are reference photographs for three of the fabrics. The model is based on a novel approach that simulates the interaction of light with cloth by simulating how each thread scatters light. The model then uses that information based on the fabric's weaving pattern. Credit: Iman Sadeghi et. al., Jacobs School of Engineering/UC San Diego

From left to right are: Silk crepe de chine, linen plain, silk shot fabric, velvet and polyester satin charmeuse. At the far right are reference photographs for three of the fabrics. The model is based on a novel approach that simulates the interaction of light with cloth by simulating how each thread scatters light. The model then uses that information based on the fabric’s weaving pattern. Credit: Iman Sadeghi et. al., Jacobs School of Engineering/UC San Diego

Computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego, have developed a new model to simulate with unprecedented accuracy on the computer the way cloth and light interact. The new model can be used in animated movies and in video games to make cloth look more realistic.

Existing models are either too simplistic and produce unrealistic results; or too complex and costly for practical use. Researchers presented their findings at the SIGGRAPH 2013 conference held July 21 to 25 in Anaheim, Calif.

“Not only is our model easy to use, it is also more powerful than existing models,” said Iman Sadeghi, who developed the model while working on his Ph.D. in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at UC San Diego. He currently works for Google in Los Angeles, after earning his Ph.D. in 2011.

“The model solves the long standing problem of rendering cloth,” said Sadeghi’s Ph.D. advisor Henrik Wann Jensen, who earned an Academy Award in 2004 for research that brought lifelike skin to animated characters and was later used in many Hollywood block busters, including “Lord of the Rings.” “Cloth in movies and games often looks wrong, and this model is the first practical way of controlling the appearance of most types of cloth in a realistic way.”

The model is based on a novel approach that simulates the interaction of light with cloth by simulating how each thread scatters light. The model then uses that information based on the fabric’s weaving pattern. “It essentially treats the fabric as a mesh of interwoven microcylinders, which scatter light the same way as hair, but are oriented at 90 degrees from each other,” Sadeghi said.

 

Read more at: Phys.org

 

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