Google Play icon

Lightning ‘halos’ could help track fierce thunderstorms

Share
Posted August 6, 2013

lightninghal[1]

Scientists from the University of Reading and Bristol Industrial and Research Associates Limited (BIRAL) have discovered a new method of tracking fierce thunderstorms.

The research concerns thunderstorms that produce upper atmospheric ‘halos’, high altitude pancake-like electrical disturbances created from strong lightning flashes. Halos are generated by thunderstorms with lightning flashes 10 times stronger than normal¹.

Halos are too faint and short-lived to be seen with the naked eye but using images from low light cameras, they were thought to be restricted to a 50 km radius around the storm. Trial ‘electric field transient’ storm detectors at the University’s Observatory and BIRAL have now showed halos actually extend several hundred kilometres.

This means that distant thunderstorms producing halos could be detected much further away than the 100km expected from just using the lightning flashes alone.

This unique thunderstorm detection method also provides a much simpler way of monitoring thunderstorms producing these mysterious halos, which are still relatively new to science, 24 hours a day. The only other method of halo observation requires sensitive, high-speed video cameras, which need a clear dark sky and unobstructed view of the horizon, which are restricted to a few locations globally.

Professor Giles Harrison, from the University of Reading’s Department of Meteorology and co-author of the study, said: “Lightning generated by thunderstorms regularly causes injury, damage and even fatalities in the UK, but predicting zones where lightning will strike is extremely difficult. At the moment thunderstorms are detected using the radio signals the lightning generates, which are used to identify regions of strongly disturbed weather. The new electrical approach adds information on the nature of the lightning hazard present, and how far it might extend from the storm system.”

Read more at: Phys.org

Featured news from related categories:

Technology Org App
Google Play icon
85,440 science & technology articles

Most Popular Articles

  1. New treatment may reverse celiac disease (October 22, 2019)
  2. "Helical Engine" Proposed by NASA Engineer could Reach 99% the Speed of Light. But could it, really? (October 17, 2019)
  3. New Class of Painkillers Offers all the Benefits of Opioids, Minus the Side Effects and Addictiveness (October 16, 2019)
  4. The World's Energy Storage Powerhouse (November 1, 2019)
  5. Plastic waste may be headed for the microwave (October 18, 2019)

Follow us

Facebook   Twitter   Pinterest   Tumblr   RSS   Newsletter via Email