Google Play icon

First reaction: lab-made burger short on flavor

Share
Posted August 6, 2013
Mark Post, developer of the stem cell burger, poses before the first public tasting, in London, Monday, Aug. 5, 2013. For hamburgers that cost more than $300,000 to produce, you might expect fries and a shake too. But this is no ordinary burger being served to two volunteer taste-testers in London on Monday. This meat was grown in a laboratory from stem cells of cattle. Mark Post, whose team at Maastricht University in the Netherlands developed the burger after five years of research, hopes that making meat in labs could eventually help solve the food crisis and fight climate change. (AP Photo/Bogdan Maran)

Mark Post, developer of the stem cell burger, poses before the first public tasting, in London, Monday, Aug. 5, 2013. For hamburgers that cost more than $300,000 to produce, you might expect fries and a shake too. But this is no ordinary burger being served to two volunteer taste-testers in London on Monday. This meat was grown in a laboratory from stem cells of cattle. Mark Post, whose team at Maastricht University in the Netherlands developed the burger after five years of research, hopes that making meat in labs could eventually help solve the food crisis and fight climate change. (AP Photo/Bogdan Maran)

They bit, they chewed, but had hoped for more flavor.

Two volunteers who participated in the first public frying of hamburger grown in a lab said Monday that it had the texture of meat but was short of flavor because of the lack of fat.

Mark Post, whose team at Maastricht University in the Netherlands developed the burger, hopes that making meat in labs could eventually help feed the world and fight climate change. That goal is many years distant, at best.

Sergey Brin, a co-founder of Google, appeared on a video shown at the event and announced that he funded the 250,000-euro ($330,000) project because of his concern for animal welfare.

“I would say it’s close to meat. I miss the salt and pepper,” said Austrian nutritionist Hanni Ruetzler, one of the volunteer tasters. Both shunned the bun and sliced tomatoes to concentrate on the meat.

“The absence is the fat, it’s a leanness to it, but the bite feels like a conventional hamburger,” said U.S. journalist Josh Schonwald. He added that he had rarely tasted a hambuger, as he did on Monday, “without ketchup or onions or jalapenos or bacon.”

Monday’s taste test, coming after five years of research, is a key step toward making lab meat a culinary phenomenon. Post called it “a good start.”

Brin expressed high hopes for the technology.

”We’re trying to create the first cultured beef hamburger. From there I’m optimistic we can really scale by leaps and bounds,” he said on the video.

Post said it’s crucial that the burger has the “look, feel and taste like the real thing.”

Despite the tasters concern about flavor, scientists say that can be tweaked.

Read more at: Phys.org

 

Featured news from related categories:



Technology Org App
Google Play icon
85,409 science & technology articles

Most Popular Articles

  1. New treatment may reverse celiac disease (October 22, 2019)
  2. "Helical Engine" Proposed by NASA Engineer could Reach 99% the Speed of Light. But could it, really? (October 17, 2019)
  3. New Class of Painkillers Offers all the Benefits of Opioids, Minus the Side Effects and Addictiveness (October 16, 2019)
  4. The World's Energy Storage Powerhouse (November 1, 2019)
  5. Plastic waste may be headed for the microwave (October 18, 2019)

Follow us

Facebook   Twitter   Pinterest   Tumblr   RSS   Newsletter via Email