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Robotic toy car drives engineering students’ business venture

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Posted July 15, 2013

A robotic toy car first developed as a class project is now the basis of a business startup by a group of Arizona State University engineering students.

They’re designing Cosmo – the car’s name – as a tool for teaching pre-school-age children basic math and spelling through games programmed into the robot’s software.

The venture, called Infinibotics, recently got a boost by winning support through the ASU Venture Catalyst program’s Edson Student Entrepreneur Initiative. The Cosmo team will receive some funding, along with business mentoring and office space during the 2013-2014 academic year.

The team includes computer systems engineering graduate students Edward Andert and Roger Dolan, computer science graduate students Shang Wang and Bryce Holton, and mechanical engineering senior Austin Deveny.

Their faculty adviser is Aviral Shrivastava, an associate professor in the School of Computing, Informatics and Decision Systems Engineering, one of ASU’s Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering.

Infinibotics stems from an idea Shrivastava came up with two years ago to teach students in one of his senior capstone engineering design courses to apply basic computer systems engineering design principles to producing a robotic toy car.

Using image-processing algorithms, the students were first instructed to follow a person walking so they could understand the mechanics of what they wanted to enable the vehicle to do.

Read more at: Phys.org

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