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Danish chemists in molecular chip breakthrough

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Posted June 21, 2013
The ultra slim carbon material graphene is pivotal in the effort by Copenhagen chemists to build smaller, faster and more green and sustainable electronic devices. Now for the first time, A team led by Kasper Nørgaard, an associate professor at Dept of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, has made a transistor made from just one molecular monolayer work where it really counts. On a computer chip. Credit: Jes Andersen/University of Copenhagen

The ultra slim carbon material graphene is pivotal in the effort by Copenhagen chemists to build smaller, faster and more green and sustainable electronic devices. Now for the first time, A team led by Kasper Nørgaard, an associate professor at Dept of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, has made a transistor made from just one molecular monolayer work where it really counts. On a computer chip. Credit: Jes Andersen/University of Copenhagen

Electronic components built from single molecules using chemical synthesis could pave the way for smaller, faster and more green and sustainable electronic devices. Now for the first time, a transistor made from just one molecular monolayer has been made to work where it really counts. On a computer chip.

The molecular integrated circuit was created by a group of chemists and physicists from the Department of Chemistry Nano-Science Center at the University of Copenhagen and Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing. Their discovery “Ultrathin Reduced Graphene Oxide Films as Transparent Top-Contacts for Light Switchable Solid-State Molecular Junctions” has just been published online in the prestigious periodical Advanced Materials. The breakthrough was made possible through an innovative use of the two dimensional carbon material graphene.

First step towards integrated molecular circuit

Kasper Nørgaard is an associate professor in chemistry at the University of Copenhagen. He believes that the first advantage of the newly developed graphene chip will be to ease the testing of coming molecular electronic components. But he is also confident, that it represents a first step towards proper integrated molecular circuits.

Read more at: Phys.org

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