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Cuba girds for climate change by reclaiming coasts

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Posted June 17, 2013
In this May 24, 2013 photo, a girl walks her dog near the remains of a destroyed school on the shores of Havana, Cuba. Cuban scientists have studied this island nation's coastline, calculating what would happen under the continued pressure of climate change. What they discovered was so alarming that more than a year later, officials still haven't released them widely to avoid causing panic. (AP Photo/Franklin Reyes)

In this May 24, 2013 photo, a girl walks her dog near the remains of a destroyed school on the shores of Havana, Cuba. Cuban scientists have studied this island nation’s coastline, calculating what would happen under the continued pressure of climate change. What they discovered was so alarming that more than a year later, officials still haven’t released them widely to avoid causing panic. (AP Photo/Franklin Reyes)

After Cuban scientists studied the effects of climate change on this island’s 3,500 miles (5,630 kilometers) of coastline, their discoveries were so alarming that officials didn’t share the results with the public to avoid causing panic.

The scientists projected that rising sea levels would seriously damage 122 Cuban towns or even wipe them off the map. Beaches would be submerged, they found, while freshwater sources would be tainted and croplands rendered infertile. In all,seawater would penetrate up to 1.2 miles (2 kilometers) inland in low-lying areas, as oceans rose nearly three feet (85 centimeters) by 2100.

Climate change may be a matter of political debate on Capitol Hill, but for low-lying Cuba, those frightening calculations have spurred systemic action. Cuba’s government has changed course on decades of haphazard coastal development, which threatens sand dunes and mangrove swamps that provide the best natural protection against rising seas.

In recent months, inspectors and demolition crews have begun fanning out across the island with plans to raze thousands of houses, restaurants, hotels and improvised docks in a race to restore much of the coast to something approaching its natural state.

“The government … realized that for an island like Cuba, long and thin, protecting the coasts is a matter of national security,” said Jorge Alvarez, director of Cuba’s government-run Center for Environmental Control and Inspection.

At the same time, Cuba has had to take into account the needs of families living in endangered homes and a $2.5 billion-a-year tourism industry that is its No. 1 source of foreign income.

Read more at: Phys.org

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