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Booz Allen says it’s fired Snowden after leak

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Posted June 12, 2013
Demonstrators hold signs supporting Edward Snowden in New York's Union Square Park, Monday, June 10, 2013. Snowden, who says he worked as a contractor at the National Security Agency and the CIA, gave classified documents to reporters, making public two sweeping U.S. surveillance programs and touching off a national debate on privacy versus security. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

Demonstrators hold signs supporting Edward Snowden in New York’s Union Square Park, Monday, June 10, 2013. Snowden, who says he worked as a contractor at the National Security Agency and the CIA, gave classified documents to reporters, making public two sweeping U.S. surveillance programs and touching off a national debate on privacy versus security. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

Edward Snowden, who admitted leaking details of secret U.S. government surveillance programs, was fired by his employer Tuesday while the U.S. government considers criminal charges against him.

Booz Allen Hamilton said in a statement that it fired Snowden on Monday “for violations of the firm’s code of ethics and firm policy.” It said he had earned a salary of $122,000 a year. The firm called Snowden’s actions “shocking” and said he had been a Booz Allen employee for less than three months.

President Barack Obama’s administration is weighing whether to charge Snowden with leaking classified surveillance secrets while it defends the broad U.S. spy program that it says keeps America safe from terrorists.

Snowden, 29, has identified himself as the person who leaked top-secret information. He fled to Hong Kong in hopes of escaping criminal charges.

Booz Allen provides consulting services, technology support and analysis to U.S. government agencies and departments. Last year, 98 percent of the company’s $5.9 billion in revenue came from U.S. government contracts. Three-fourths of its 25,000 employees hold government security clearances. Half the employees have top secret clearances.

Snowden previously worked for the CIA and likely obtained his security clearance there. But like others who leave the government to join private contractors, he was able to keep his clearance after he left and began working for outside firms.

Once given security clearance, workers can access offices, files and, most important, dedicated communications and computer networks that are walled off from the public.

Snowden says he accessed and downloaded the last of the documents that detailed the surveillance program while working in an NSA office in Hawaii for Booz Allen.

Read more at: Phys.org

 

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