Google Play icon

New study predicts rising irrigation costs, reduced yields for US corn

Share
Posted June 4, 2013
Two maps simulate irrigation needs (top) and yields (bottom) anticipated for ethanol corn crops in the 2050s if predicted climate changes come to pass. Red indicates a detrimental effect, where irrigation needs would increase and yields would decrease. The study led by researchers at Rice University and the University of California at Davis appears in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. Credit: Rosa Dominguez-Faus/UC Davis

Two maps simulate irrigation needs (top) and yields (bottom) anticipated for ethanol corn crops in the 2050s if predicted climate changes come to pass. Red indicates a detrimental effect, where irrigation needs would increase and yields would decrease. The study led by researchers at Rice University and the University of California at Davis appears in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. Credit: Rosa Dominguez-Faus/UC Davis

If the climate continues to evolve as predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the United States stands little to no chance of satisfying its current biofuel goals, according to a new study by Rice University and the University of California at Davis.

The study published online in the American Chemical Society journal Environmental Science and Technology suggests that in 40 years, a hotter planet would cut the yield of corn grown for ethanol in the U.S. by an average of 7 percent while increasing the amount of irrigation necessary by 9 percent.

That could sharply hinder a mandate set by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) that by 2022 the nation derive 15 billion gallons per year of ethanol from corn to blend with conventional motor fuels, according to principal investigator Pedro Alvarez, the George R. Brown Professor and chair of Rice’s Civil and Environmental Engineering Department. Alvarez is a member of the Science Advisory Board of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and chair of Rice’s Energy and Environment Initiative.

The policy is based on the idea that blending ethanol into gasoline cuts harmful emissions from vehicles and lowers the nation’s dependence on foreign oil, he said. But the cost in water may outweigh those concerns.

“Whereas biofuels offer a means to use more renewable energy while decreasing reliance on imported oil, it is important to recognize the tradeoffs,” Alvarez said. “One important unintended consequence may be the aggravation of water scarcity by increased irrigation in some regions.”

The authors of the new paper have long questioned the United States’ support of biofuels as a means to cut vehicle emissions. In a 2010 white paper on U.S. biofuels policy produced by Rice’s Baker Institute for Public Policy, authors including Alvarez and Rice alumna Rosa Dominguez-Faus found “no scientific consensus on the climate-friendly nature of U.S.-produced corn-based ethanol” and detailed what they saw as economic, environmental and logistical shortcomings in the EISA.

Read more at: Phys.org

Featured news from related categories:

Technology Org App
Google Play icon
85,465 science & technology articles

Most Popular Articles

  1. New treatment may reverse celiac disease (October 22, 2019)
  2. "Helical Engine" Proposed by NASA Engineer could Reach 99% the Speed of Light. But could it, really? (October 17, 2019)
  3. The World's Energy Storage Powerhouse (November 1, 2019)
  4. Plastic waste may be headed for the microwave (October 18, 2019)
  5. Universe is a Sphere and Not Flat After All According to a New Research (November 7, 2019)

Follow us

Facebook   Twitter   Pinterest   Tumblr   RSS   Newsletter via Email