Google Play icon

Good cats wear black: Black nanoparticles could play key role in clean energy photocatalysis

Share
Posted April 12, 2013
Berkeley Lab’s Samuel Mao used disorder engineering to transform titanium nanocrystals into highly efficient solar hydrogen photocatalysts, a transformation marked by turning the crystals from white to black. Credit: Roy Kaltschmidt

Berkeley Lab’s Samuel Mao used disorder engineering to transform titanium nanocrystals into highly efficient solar hydrogen photocatalysts, a transformation marked by turning the crystals from white to black. Credit: Roy Kaltschmidt

A unique atomic-scale engineering technique for turning low-efficiency photocatalytic “white” nanoparticles of titanium dioxide into high-efficiency “black” nanoparticles could be the key to clean energy technologies based on hydrogen.

Samuel Mao, a scientist who holds joint appointments with Berkeley Lab’s Environmental Energy Technologies Division and the University of California at Berkeley, leads the development of a technique for engineering disorder into the nanocrystalline structure of the semiconductor titanium dioxide. This turns the naturally white crystals black in color, a sign that the crystals are now able to absorb infrared as well as visible and ultraviolet light. The expanded absorption spectrum substantially improves the efficiency with which black titanium dioxide can use sunlight to split water molecules for the production of hydrogen.

“We have demonstrated that black titanium dioxide nanoparticles are capable of generating hydrogen through solar-driven photocatalytic reactions with a record-high efficiency,” Mao said in a talk at the American Chemical Society (ACS)’s national meeting in New Orleans.

“The synthesis of black titanium dioxide nanoparticles was based on a hydrogenation process in which white titanium dioxide nanocrystals were subjected to high pressure hydrogen gas,” said Mao. “The unique disordered structure creates a photocatalyst that is both durable and efficient, and gives titanium dioxide, one of the most-studied of all oxide materials, a renewed potential.”

Read more at: Phys.org

Featured news from related categories:

Technology Org App
Google Play icon
86,841 science & technology articles