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Observing electrons in real-time could lead to faster computing

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Posted March 25, 2013
Using consecutive laser pulses, the researchers observe electrons in real-time. Credit: Saaty Photography

Using consecutive laser pulses, the researchers observe electrons in real-time. Credit: Saaty Photography

New research revealing the interactions between electrons and organic carrier materials in devices that use electron spin to encode information could help in the development of faster and more efficient data storage technology.

By observing electrons in real-time over a few millionths of a billionth of a second, physicists have been able to demonstrate that organic molecules interact with the magnetic electrode in so-called spintronic devices, opening the possibility of manufacturing such data storage devices from cheaper, carbon-based materials instead of metals and silicon. The drive toward more powerful, faster and smaller computer and telecommunication devices has kept scientists busy for quite a while, with considerable advances made over the last few years. For example, the rapid turn-on time of modern computers is made possible by the recent development of magnetic memory, or MRAM. Traditional ways of accessing data quickly are based on the manipulation of electric charges, which works only while a computer is powered up. MRAMs on the other hand use magnetic storage elements, delivering high-speed, non-volatile memory.

Read more at: Phys.org

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