Google Play icon

A nanosheet transistor: Precise control of superconductivity by voltage application

Share
Posted March 5, 2013
Device structure used in the study. MoSsub>2 nano-sheet showed superior transistor performance. A twin gate structure allowed fine tuning of superconductivity. © Iwasa Laboratory

Device structure used in the study. MoSsub>2 nano-sheet showed superior transistor performance. A twin gate structure allowed fine tuning of superconductivity. © Iwasa Laboratory

Research group at the University of Tokyo Graduate School of Engineering Quantum-Phase Electronics Center have produced a field-effect transistor of molybdenum disulfide, a material that is attracting researchers’ attention as a novel nanosheet material and alternative to graphene. The researchers demonstrated that this transistor showed excellent characteristics, and also demonstrated the controlled expression of superconductivity by the application of a voltage.

Materials research for low power consumption transistors has focused on oxides and organic materials, but single-atom-thick graphene nanosheets have also been considered a strong contender. However, graphene’s narrow band-gap and poor switching characteristics have prompted researchers to search for alternative materials with a wider band gap. The research group focused on molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), which has long been used as a mechanical lubricant, and prepared a transistor using a gate insulator and electrical double layer. The researchers confirmed that MoS2 becomes superconducting below 10K when a voltage is applied, and succeeded in continuously changing the transition temperature by varying the applied voltage.

The present study, in addition to providing a powerful means of controlling superconductivity, has shown that MoS2 and its class of similar materials are leading candidates for nanosheet materials to replace graphene.

Paper: T. Ye, Y. J. Zhang, R. Akashi, M. S. Bahramy, R. Arita, and Y. Iwasa, “Superconducting Dome in a Gate-Tuned Band Insulator,”  Science vol.338, 2012: 1193-1196, doi10.1126/science.1228006. Article link

Source: University of Tokyo

Featured news from related categories:

Technology Org App
Google Play icon
85,339 science & technology articles

Most Popular Articles

  1. New treatment may reverse celiac disease (October 22, 2019)
  2. "Helical Engine" Proposed by NASA Engineer could Reach 99% the Speed of Light. But could it, really? (October 17, 2019)
  3. New Class of Painkillers Offers all the Benefits of Opioids, Minus the Side Effects and Addictiveness (October 16, 2019)
  4. The World's Energy Storage Powerhouse (November 1, 2019)
  5. Plastic waste may be headed for the microwave (October 18, 2019)

Follow us

Facebook   Twitter   Pinterest   Tumblr   RSS   Newsletter via Email