29,537 science & technology articles
 
  • ‘Digital Tattoos’ unlocks your smartphone
    Digital tattoo will help you to unlock your mobile device faster than tapping or swiping your secret combination on the display. These Digital tattoos are just stickers and aren’t permanent like regular tattoos. These stickers you can apply to any part of you body, for example an arm.  … Read more
  • Nearly 50 years of lemur data now available online
    A 48-year archive of life history data for the world’s largest and most diverse collection of endangered primates is now digital and available online.The Duke Lemur Center database allows visitors to view and download data for more than 3600 animals representing 27 species of lemurs, lorises and galagos — distant primate cousins who predate monkeys and apes — with more data to be uploaded in the future. … Read more
  • Unleashing the power of quantum dot triplets
    Quantum computers have yet to materialise. Yet, scientists are making progress in devising suitable means of making such computers faster. One such approach relies on quantum dots—a kind of artificial atom, easily controlled by applying an electric field. A new study demonstrates that changing the coupling of three coherently coupled quantum dots (TQDs) with electrical impulses can help better control them. This has implications, for example, should TQDs be used as quantum information units, which would produce faster quantum computers due to the fact that they would be operated through electrical impulses. These findings have been published in EPJ B by Sahib Babaee Tooski and colleagues affiliated with both the Institute of Molecular Physics at the Polish Academy of Sciences, in Poznan, Poland, the University of Ljubljana and the Jožef Stefan Institute in Slovenia. … Read more
  • Graphene and related materials promise cheap, flexible printed cameras
    Dr Felice Torrisi, University Lecturer in Graphene Technology, has been awarded a Young International Researchers’ Fellowship from the National Science Foundation of China to look at how graphene and two-dimensional materials could enable printed and flexible eyes. … Read more
  • The future of ultrashort laser pulses
    Rapid advances in techniques for the creation of ultra-short laser pulses promise to boost our knowledge of electron motions to an unprecedented level. … Read more
  • Ultra-deep astrophoto of the Antenna Galaxies
    75 hours of observing time allows for this ‘amateur’ view of the Antennae galaxies in the constellation Corvus. Look closely to see the myriad of distant background galaxies that show up in the image, as well. Credit and copyright: Rolf Wahl Olsen. You might think the image above of the famous Antenna Galaxies was taken by a large ground-based or even a space telescope. Think again. Amateur astronomer Rolf Wahl Olsen from New Zealand compiled a total of 75 hours of observing time to create this ultra-deep view. “To obtain a unique deep view of the faint tidal streams and numerous distant background galaxies I gathered 75 hours on this target during 38 nights from January to June 2014,” Rolf said via email. “At times it was rather frustrating because clouds kept interrupting my sessions.” But he persisted, and the results are stunning. He used his new 12.5″ f/4 Serrurier Truss Newtonian telescope, which he said gathers approximately 156% the amount of light over his old 10″ f/5 telescope. Rolf even has put together comparison shots from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Very Large Telescope of the same field of view: Comparison images from the Hubble Space Telescope and … Read more
  • Quenching the world’s water and energy crises, one tiny droplet at a time
    In pursuit of beetle biomimicry, NSF-funded engineers develop new, textured materials to trap and channel small amounts of liquid A beetle in the Namib Desert of Africa drinks 12 percent of its body weight in fog each day. In the Namib Desert of Africa, the fog-filled morning wind carries the drinking water for a beetle called the Stenocara. Tiny droplets collect on the beetle’s bumpy back. The areas between the bumps are covered in a waxy substance that makes them water-repellant, or hydrophobic (water-fearing). Water accumulates on the water-loving, or hydrophilic, bumps, forming droplets that eventually grow too big to stay put, then roll down the waxy surface. … Read more
  • Four billion-year-old chemistry in cells today
    Parts of the primordial soup in which life arose have been maintained in our cells today according to scientists at the University of East Anglia. Research published today in the Journal of Biological Chemistry reveals how cells in plants, yeast and very likely also in animals still perform ancient reactions thought to have been responsible for the origin of life – some four billion years ago. … Read more
  • Students use physics to unpack DNA, one molecule at a time
    If two individuals have the same genetic predisposition for breast cancer, why does one person develop cancer while the other does not? Is it possible to use physics to help ensure that these genetic predispositions never manifest themselves? Biophysicist and physics professor Kurt Andresen thinks so. He and his students have spent the summer researching how our DNA packs together, how this packing may expose certain disease-causing (or curing) DNA regions, and how we might be able to manipulate these molecules and their packing to prevent harmful genetic traits. … Read more
  • Cost-effective, solvothermal synthesis of heteroatom (S or N)-doped graphene developed
    A research team led by group leader Yung-Eun Sung has announced that they have developed cost-effective technology to synthesize sulfur-doped and nitrogen-doped graphenes which can be applied as high performance electrodes for secondary batteries and fuel cells. Yung-Eun Sung is both a group leader at the Center for Nanoparticle Research at Institute for Basic Science* (IBS) and a professor at the Seoul National University. … Read more
  • Fukushima accident underscores need for US to seek out new information about nuclear plant hazards
    A new congressionally mandated report from the National Academy of Sciences concludes that the overarching lesson learned from the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident is that nuclear plant licensees and their regulators must actively seek out and act on new information about hazards with the potential to affect the safety of nuclear plants. The committee that wrote the report examined the causes of the Japan accident and identified findings and recommendations for improving nuclear plant safety and offsite emergency responses to nuclear plant accidents in the U.S. … Read more
  • Study indicates large raptors in Africa used for bushmeat
    Bushmeat, the use of native animal species for food or commercial food sale, has been heavily documented to be a significant factor in the decline of many species of primates and other mammals. However, a new study indicates that more than half of the species being consumed are birds, particularly large birds like raptors and hornbills. … Read more
  • Study shows how to power California with wind, water and sun
    New research outlines the path to a possible future for California in which renewable energy creates a healthier environment, generates jobs and stabilizes energy prices. … Read more
  • A new approach to creating organic zeolites
    UD researcher Yushan Yan has reported a significant advance in the creation of organic zeolites in the journal Nature Communications. Yan organic zeolite advance highlighted in Nature Communications Yushan Yan, Distinguished Professor of Engineering at the University of Delaware, is known worldwide for using nanomaterials to solve problems in energy engineering, environmental sustainability and electronics. His early academic work focused on zeolites, porous rock with a well-defined, crystalline structure. At the atomic scale, their pore size is so precisely decided that zeolites can separate molecules with size differences of merely a fraction of an angstrom (one-tenth of a nanometer), making them useful to the chemical and petroleum industries as molecular sieves for separation and catalysis processes.  … Read more
  • Study shows role of media in sharing life events
    To share is human. And the means to share personal news — good and bad — have exploded over the last decade, particularly social media and texting. But until now, all research about what is known as “social sharing,” or the act of telling others about the important events in our lives, has been restricted to face-to-face interactions. … Read more
  • The microbes make the sake brewery
    A sake brewery has its own microbial terroir, meaning the microbial populations found on surfaces in the facility resemble those found in the product, creating the final flavor according to research published ahead of print in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology. This is the first time investigators have taken a microbial census of a sake brewery. … Read more
  • Artificial intelligence identifies the musical progression of the Beatles
    Music fans and critics know that the music of the Beatles underwent a dramatic transformation in just a few years, but until now there hasn’t been a scientific way to measure the progression. That could change now that computer scientists at Lawrence Technological University have developed an artificial intelligence algorithm that can analyze and compare musical styles, enabling research into the musical progression of the Beatles. … Read more
  • Researchers find new mechanism for neurodegeneration
    Bar Harbor, Maine — A research team led by Jackson Laboratory Professor and Howard Hughes Investigator Susan Ackerman, Ph.D., has pinpointed a surprising mechanism behind neurodegeneration in mice, one that involves a defect in a key component of the cellular machinery that makes proteins, known as transfer RNA or tRNA. The researchers report in the journal Science that a mutation in a gene that produces tRNAs operating only in the central nervous system results in a “stalling” or pausing of the protein production process in the neuronal ribosomes. When another protein the researchers identified, GTPBP2, is also missing, neurodegeneration results. … Read more
  • Newly discovered gut virus lives in half the world’s population
    Odds are, there’s a virus living inside your gut that has gone undetected by scientists for decades. A new study led by researchers at San Diego State University has found that more than half the world’s population is host to a newly described virus, named crAssphage, which infects one of the most common types of gut bacteria,Bacteroidetes. This phylum of bacteria is thought to be connected with obesity, diabetes and other gut-related diseases. The research appears today in Nature Communications. … Read more
  • A protein couple controls flow of information into the brain’s memory center
    Neuroscientists in Bonn and Heidelberg have succeeded in providing new insights into how the brain works. Researchers at the DZNE and the German Cancer Research Center(DKFZ) analyzed tissue samples from mice to identify how two specific proteins, ‘CKAMP44’ and ‘TARP Gamma-8’, act upon the brain’s memory center. These molecules, which have similar counterparts in humans, affect the connections between nerve cells and influence the transmission of nerve signals into the hippocampus, an area of the brain that plays a significant role in learning processes and the creation of memories. The results of the study have been published in the journal Neuron. … Read more
  • Atomic structure of key muscle component revealed
    Actin is the most abundant protein in the body, and when you look more closely at its fundamental role in life, it’s easy to see why. It is the basis of most movement in the body, and all cells and components within them have the capacity to move: muscle contracting, heart beating, blood clotting, and nerve cells communicating, among many other functions. And, movement can turn harmful when cancer cells break away from tumors to set up shop in distant tissues. … Read more
  • Leaf-mining insects destroyed with the dinosaurs, others quickly appeared
    A mine produced by a micromoth larva on Platanus raynoldsii, a sycamore. Image: Michael Donovan/Penn State After the asteroid impact at the end of the Cretaceous period that triggered the dinosaurs’ extinction and ushered in the Paleocene, leaf-mining insects in the western United States completely disappeared. Only a million years later, at Mexican Hat, in southeastern Montana, fossil leaves show diverse leaf-mining traces from new insects that were not present during the Cretaceous, according to paleontologists. “Our results indicate both that leaf-mining diversity at Mexican Hat is even higher than previously recognized, and equally importantly, that none of the Mexican Hat mines can be linked back to the local Cretaceous mining fauna,” said Michael Donovan, graduate student in geosciences, Penn State. Insects that eat leaves produce very specific types of damage. One type is from leaf miners — insect larvae that live in the leaves and tunnel for food, leaving distinctive feeding paths and patterns of droppings. Donovan, Peter Wilf, professor of geosciences, Penn State, and colleagues looked at 1,073 leaf fossils from Mexican Hat for mines. They compared these with more than 9,000 leaves from the end of the Cretaceous, 65 million years ago, from the Hell Creek Formation in southwestern North Dakota, … Read more
  • Nike krypton laser achieves spot in Guinness World Records
    A set of experiments conducted on the Nike krypton fluoride (KrF) laser at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) nearly five years ago has, at long last, earned the coveted Guinness World Records title for achieving “Highest Projectile Velocity” of greater than 1,000 kilometers per second (km/s), a speed equivalent to two-and-a-quarter million miles per hour. … Read more
  • No returning to Eden: Researchers explore how to restore species in a changing world
    Reversing the increasing rate of global biodiversity losses may not be possible without embracing intensive, and sometimes controversial, forms of threatened species management, according to a New Zealand zoologist and colleagues writing in the leading international journal Science. In a review article appearing in today’s edition, Professor Philip Seddon of the University of Otago and his co-authors examine the growing role that ‘conservation translocation’, which is the movement and release of plants and animals to re-establish new populations, is playing in efforts to combat biodiversity loss. … Read more
  • Brain’s dynamic duel underlies win-win choices
    People choosing between two or more equally positive outcomes experience paradoxical feelings of pleasure and anxiety, feelings associated with activity in different regions of the brain, according to research led by Amitai Shenhav, an associate research scholar at the Princeton Neuroscience Institute at Princeton University. … Read more
  • New approach to form non-equilibrium structures
    Although most natural and synthetic processes prefer to settle into equilibrium—a state of unchanging balance without potential or energy—it is within the realm of non-equilibrium conditions where new possibilities lie. Non-equilibrium systems experience constant changes in energy and phases, such as temperature fluctuations, freezing and melting, or movement. These conditions allow humans to regulate their body temperature, airplanes to fly, and the Earth to rumble with seismic activity.  … Read more
  • Study reveals new characteristics of complex oxide surfaces
    An Oak Ridge National Laboratory study combined microscopy and data processing to provide an unprecedented look at the surface of a magnanite material known for its unusual properties. The resulting “distortion maps” (right) brought into view structural areas called domains that were not easily identified in the raw images (left). (hi-res image)   A novel combination of microscopy and data processing has given researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory an unprecedented look at the surface of a material known for its unusual physical and electrochemical properties. The research team led by ORNL’s Zheng Gai examined how oxygen affects the surface of a perovskite manganite, a complex material that exhibits dramatic magnetic and electronic behavior. The new avenue to understand surface behavior could benefit researchers who are interested in using a wide range of correlated oxide materials for applications such as solid fuel cells or oxygen sensors. … Read more
  • Satellite galaxies put astronomers in a spin
    An international team of researchers, led by astronomers at the Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg (CNRS/Université de Strasbourg), has studied 380 galaxies and shown that their small satellite galaxies almost always move in rotating discs. However, such satellite galaxy discs are not predicted by current models of the formation of structures in the Universe. This discovery could cause modelers serious headaches in the years ahead. The results of the study are published in the 31 July 2014 issue of the journal Nature (“Velocity anti-correlation of diametrically opposed galaxy satellites in the low-redshift universe”). … Read more
  • Invertebrate numbers nearly halve as human population doubles
    Invertebrate numbers have decreased by 45% on average over a 35 year period in which the human population doubled, reports a study on the impact of humans on declining animal numbers.  … Read more
  • Global wildlife decline driving slave labor, organized crime
    Berkeley — Global decline of wildlife populations is driving increases in violent conflicts, organized crime and child labor around the world, according to a policy paper led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. The authors call for biologists to join forces with experts such as economists, political scientists, criminologists, public health officials and international development specialists to collectively tackle a complex challenge. … Read more
  • Earlier Stone Age artifacts found in Northern Cape of South Africa
    Excavations at an archaeological site at Kathu in the Northern Cape province of South Africa have produced tens of thousands of Earlier Stone Age artifacts, including hand axes and other tools. These discoveries were made by archaeologists from the University of Cape Town (UCT), South Africa and the University of Toronto (U of T), in collaboration with the McGregor Museum in Kimberley, South Africa. … Read more
  • Discovery is key to metal wear in sliding parts
    This sequence of images reveals surprising fluid-like behavior in a solid piece of metal sliding over another, forming defects leading to wear in metal parts. (Top) Two image frames of the material flow showing how these defects are spawned in the wake of the contact. (Bottom) Scanning electron microscope pictures of the corresponding wear surfaces showing a tear and a crack. Wear particles are formed when the tears and cracks detach from the surfaces. (Purdue University School of Industrial Engineering image/Anirban Mahato) Download Photo   Researchers have discovered a previously unknown mechanism for wear in metals: a swirling, fluid-like microscopic behavior in a solid piece of metal sliding over another.  The findings could be used to improve the durability of metal parts in numerous applications. … Read more
  • Researchers demonstrate reconfigurable clusters made of colloidal particles as a form of data storage
    A team of researchers with member affiliations to a large number of universities in the U.S. has created clusters of colloidal particles (spheres) in a liquid that is able to be manipulated in such a way as to represent different states such as “0″ or “1″ thereby suggesting a novel way to store large amounts of data in a small amount of liquid. In their paper published in the journal Soft Matter, the team describes their findings and suggests that soft matter may hold potential as a digital colloid for possible data storage in the future. … Read more
  • Commercial Dream Chaser closer to critical design review and first flight
    Dream Chaser commercial crew vehicle built by Sierra Nevada Corp docks at ISS The winged Dream Chaser mini-shuttle under development by Sierra Nevada Corp. (SNC) has successfully completed a series of risk reduction milestone tests on key flight hardware systems thereby moving the private reusable spacecraft closer to its critical design review (CDR) and first flight under NASA’s Commercial Crew Program aimed at restoring America’s indigenous human spaceflight access to low Earth orbit and the space station. … Read more
  • 8.2 percent of our DNA is ‘functional’
    Only 8.2% of human DNA is likely to be doing something important – is ‘functional’ – say Oxford University researchers. This figure is very different from one given in 2012, when some scientists involved in the ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements) project stated that 80% of our genome has some biochemical function. That claim has been controversial, with many in the field arguing that the biochemical definition of ‘function’ was too broad – that just because an activity on DNA occurs, it does not necessarily have a consequence; for functionality you need to demonstrate that an activity matters. … Read more
  • Marine biologist claims lionfish study by sixth grader was lifted from his research
    Antennata Lionfish, picture taken in Zoo Schönbrunn, Vienna, Austria. Credit: Christian Mehlführer/Wikipedia Zack Jud, a PhD graduate of Florida International University and current marine biologist, has caused a small ruckus in the marine biology community by posting comments on his Facebook Page, suggesting that the work done by thirteen year old Lauren Arrington was actually based on work he’d already done. Arrington, a sixth grade student in Jupiter Florida, and daughter of a professional biologist gained Internet notoriety this past week after news of experiments she conducted on lionfish went viral. Her experiments, which were used as a project in a science fair, demonstrated that lionfish can live in less saline water than had been previously thought. Jud contends that Arrington’s experiments were based on his work, and that he should be getting the credit for the results. Read more at: Phys.org … Read more
  • Synchronization of North Atlantic, North Pacific preceded abrupt warming, end of ice age
    Scientists have long been concerned that global warming may push Earth’s climate system across a “tipping point,” where rapid melting of ice and further warming may become irreversible – a hotly debated scenario with an unclear picture of what this point of no return may look like. … Read more
  • New research suggests Saharan dust is key to the formation of Bahamas’ Great Bank
    MIAMI – A new study suggests that Saharan dust played a major role in the formation of the Bahamas islands. Researchers from the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science showed that iron-rich Saharan dust provides the nutrients necessary for specialized bacteria to produce the island chain’s carbonate-based foundation. … Read more
  • Bright like a diamond: lasers and compressed carbon recreate Jupiter’s core
    The lighted interior of the target chamber at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The object entering from the left is the target positioner, on which the target is mounted. Researchers recently used NIF to study the interior state of giant planets. Credit: Image by Damien Jemison/LLNL While missions like the Kepler can tell us quite a bit about other worlds, to actually look into the heart of a planet we had to put a diamond through a pretty rough road-test. … Read more
  • Skype 5.0 for Android lets you find your friends automatically
    Skype’s updated 5.0 version for Android. This brought a new feature for finding the people you’re looking for on Skype. This version will let you connect Skype to your phone address book. It will be easier to find contacts you already know on Skype. … Read more
  • NASA’s HS3 mission spotlight: The HIRAD instrument
    Artist’s concept of aircraft with HIRAD scanning a tropical cyclone. Image Credit: NASA The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer, known as HIRAD, will fly aboard one of two unmanned Global Hawk aircraft during NASA’s Hurricane Severe Storm Sentinel or HS3 mission from Wallops beginning August 26 through September 29. One of the NASA Global Hawks will cover the storm environment and the other will analyze inner-storm conditions. HIRAD will fly aboard the inner-storm Global Hawk and will be positioned at the bottom, rear section of the aircraft. “HIRAD’s purpose is to map out where the strongest winds are in a hurricane. During its first deployment in 2010 for the GRIP airborne campaign, HIRAD had two interesting hurricane cases, Earl and Karl,” said Daniel J. Cecil, the principal investigator for the HIRAD instrument at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama. “We have made improvements to the instrument since then, and are looking forward to the next good case – out over water, avoiding land of course!” Data from the real-time HIRAD data stream from the Hurricane Ingrid flight on Sept. 15. The greenish-blue and yellow area near Mexico suggests rain and strong winds in Hurricane Ingrid. The dark red across north Florida … Read more
  • An increase in temperature by 2050 may be advantageous to the growth of forage plants
    A 2°C increase in temperature around the world by 2050, according to one of the scenarios predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), may be advantageous to the physiology and the biochemical and biophysical processes involved in the growth of forage plants such as Stylosanthes capitata Vogel, a legume utilized for livestock grazing in tropical countries such as Brazil. … Read more
  • Where have all the swallows gone?
    PhD student Tara Imlay holds a male Barn Swallow. (Provided photos) Extinction: the permanent loss of a species. It is deeply troubling — and scientists and birdwatchers are ringing the alarm about a bird species that only a few decades ago was widespread and very common. Swallows, along with other birds that feed primarily on flying insects, are experiencing the greatest population declines for any group of birds in North America, and their declines are particularly pronounced in the Maritimes. The Barn Swallow, for example, has seen a 95 per cent drop in numbers across North America in the last forty years, placing it on the endangered species list in Nova Scotia. PhD student Tara Imlay and master’s student Sarah Saldanha are trying to figure out why this is happening — hopefully, a first step in reversing this alarming trend. “This decline is especially concerning because this type of bird used to be so widespread and abundant and the decline of a common, widepread species hints at a broad scale cause,” explains Saldnha. “Although this decline may be attributed to changes in North America ecosystems, it may also be attributed to changes in the birds’ wintering grounds.” An ecological mystery … Read more
  • Research charts the ecological impact of microbial respiration in the oxygen-starved ocean
    A sulfur-oxidizing bacterial group called SUP05 will play an increasingly important role in carbon and nutrient cycling in the world’s oceans as oxygen minimum zones expand, according to research published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. University of British Columbia researchers plumbed the depth of a seasonally anoxic fjord, Canada’s Saanich Inlet, to chart how microbial community metabolism changes as oxygen minimum zones form. … Read more
  • Watch the Falcon 9 rocket booster descend into the ocean for its “soft” landing
    SpaceX today released video from the Falcon 9 first stage flyback and landing video from the July 14 launch of six ORBCOMM advanced telecommunications satellites. This was a test of the reusability of the Falcon 9′s first stage and its flyback and landing system. It splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean, and SpaceX called it a “soft” landing, even though the booster did not survive the splashdown. SpaceX CEO Elon Musk tweeted on July 14 that the rocket booster reentry, landing burn and leg deployment worked well, but the hull of the first stage “lost integrity right after splashdown (aka kaboom).” He later reported that detailed review of rocket telemetry showed the booster took a “body slam, maybe from a self-generated wave.” SpaceX today said last week’s test “confirms that the Falcon 9 booster is able consistently to reenter from space at hypersonic velocity, restart main engines twice, deploy landing legs and touch down at near zero velocity.” Screenshot from the SpaceX webcast of the Falcon 9 launch on July 14, 2013. This video is of much higher quality than the video from the first soft landing test in the ocean, back in April of this year following the launch of the CRS-3 mission … Read more
  • Company converts coconut husk fibers into materials for cars and homes
    Pile of discarded coconut husks. Approximately 50 billion coconuts fall from trees annually worldwide. The husk and shell, which are by-products of the coconut oil and water industries, are typically discarded or burned. Credit: Essentium Materials, LLC When Elisa Teipel, and her collaborators began their research several years ago, their goal was to take an agricultural waste product of little value—in this case, fibers extracted from coconut husks—and turn it into an environmentally-friendly, valuable commodity. … Read more
  • The electric slide dance of DNA knots
    DNA has the nasty habit of getting tangled and forming knots. Scientists study these knots to understand their function and learn how to disentangle them (e.g. useful for gene sequencing techniques). Cristian Micheletti, professor at the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste and his team have been carrying out research in which they simulate these knots and their dynamics. In their latest paper, just published in the journal Soft Matter, Micheletti together with Marco Di Stefano, first author and PhD student at SISSA, and colleagues from Ljubljana and San Diego devised and tested a method based on the application of electric fields and “optical tweezers”. … Read more
  • Study finds missing piece of biogeochemical puzzle in aquifer
    A study published in Science by researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory and co-authored by Georgia Tech may dramatically shift our understanding of the complex dance of microbes and minerals that takes place in aquifers deep underground. This dance affects groundwater quality, the fate of contaminants in the ground and the emerging science of carbon sequestration. … Read more
  • A crystal wedding in the nanocosmos
    Researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), the Vienna University of Technology and the Maria Curie-Skłodowska University Lublin have succeeded in embedding nearly perfect semiconductor crystals into a silicon nanowire. With this new method of producing hybrid nanowires, very fast and multi-functional processing units can be accommodated on a single chip in the future. The research results will be published in the journal Nano Research. … Read more
  • New etching process builds custom nanostructures for X-ray optics
    Scientists at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have invented a customizable chemical etching process that can be used to manufacture high-performance focusing devices for the brightest X-ray sources on the planet, as well as to make other nanoscale structures such as biosensors and battery electrodes. … Read more
  • Eco-pottery product from water treatment sludge
    Pottery making in Sarawak, Malaysia. Credit: Colin Charles / Flickr Sludge is a by-product of water treatment. Sludge is produced during the clarification and filtration process in the water treatment system. It is also produced from the accumulated solids removed from sedimentation basin or settling tank. … Read more
  • Blood flow lends insights to bird flight and motion
    Four species of moa bird compared to a human. Numbers 2-4 were among the eight species of moa studied. 1. Dinornis novaezelandiae (3 meters tall). 2. Emeus crassus (1.8 meters tall). 3. Anomalopteryx didiformis (1.3 meters). 4. Dinornis robustus (3.5 meters tall).Image: Wikimedia Commons THE blood flow to leg bones in birds has been shown to correlate to their locomotion patterns. Researchers at the Universities of Western Australia and Adelaide compared volant (flying) and cursorial (running) birds by estimating blood flow from the size of the nutrient foramen (hole) in the femur. The artery supplying the bone passes through this hole. They looked at 100 species of living birds and measured the area of the foramen opening, which represented the size of the blood vessel passing through it, and also measured volume and mass of the femur. … Read more
  • Should we listen to our genes, or does mother know best?
    The new study shows in rapidly changing environments, offspring develop very different characteristics from their mothers to meet new challenges to survival. Should we listen to our genes, or does mother know best? Breaking the mould of inherited family characteristics could help you survive in a fast-changing world, scientists have discovered. … Read more
  • Dead body feeding larvae useful in forensic investigations
    Non-biting blow fly Chrysomya megacephala is commonly found in dead bodies and is used in forensic investigations to determine the time of death, referred to as the post mortem interval. A report of synanthropic derived form of C. megacephala from Tamil Nadu is provided for the first time based on morphological features and molecular characterization through generation of DNA barcoding. This study, significant in forensic investigations was published in the open access Biodiversity Data Journal. … Read more
  • Genetic study shows major impact of climate change on Antarctic fur seals
    Antarctic fur seal colony at Bird Island, South Georgia, during the breeding season season. (Photo: Jaume Forcada, British Antarctic Survey) Genetic analysis of Antarctic fur seals, alongside decades of in-depth monitoring,* has provided unique insights into the effect of climate change on a population of top-predators. Published in Nature this week, the findings show that the seals have significantly altered in accordance with changes in food availability that are associated with climate conditions. Despite a shift in the population towards ‘fitter’ individuals, this fitness is not passing down through generations, leaving the population in decline. Environmental change is expected to affect many species and biological systems throughout the world. To understand these changes long-term monitoring is required. The British Antarctic Survey’s unique Long Term Monitoring and Survey programme has given researchers a rare opportunity to explore how fur seal life histories have changed over time in relation to the climate and food availability. Researchers from the British Antarctic Survey and Bielefeld University in Germany analysed data gathered from as far back as 1981 to assess changes over generations of female fur seals on South Georgia, in the South Atlantic Ocean. Lead author, Dr Jaume Forcada from the British Antarctic Survey explains: “Compared … Read more
  • Nano-sized chip “sniffs out” explosives far better than trained dogs
    Security forces worldwide rely on sophisticated equipment, trained personnel, and detection dogs to safeguard airports and other public areas against terrorist attacks. A revolutionary new electronic chip with nano-sized chemical sensors is about to make their job much easier. … Read more
  • New view of stomach cancer could hasten better therapies
    Adam Bass, MD In a massive effort to catalog the molecular causes of stomach cancer, scientists, including researchers from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, have identified four subtypes of tumors based on shared mutations and other molecular abnormalities. They say the new classification promises to advance clinical research to develop improved therapies for the third-leading cancer killer worldwide. … Read more
  • Genetics of cancer: Non-coding DNA can finally be decoded
    Cancer is a disease of the genome resulting from a combination of genetic modifications (or mutations). We inherit from our parents strong or weak predispositions to developing certain kinds of cancer; in addition, we also accumulate new mutations in our cells throughout our lifetime. Although the genetic origins of cancers have been studied for a long time, researchers were not able to measure the role of non-coding regions of the genome until now. A team of geneticists from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), by studying tissues from patients suffering from colorectal cancer, have succeeded in decoding this unexplored, but crucial, part of our genome. Their results can be found in Nature. … Read more
  • How much magma is hiding beneath our feet?
    Molten rock (or magma) has a strong influence on our planet and its inhabitants, causing destructive volcanic eruptions and generating some of the giant mineral deposits. Our understanding of these phenomena is, however, limited by the fact that most magma cools and solidifies several kilometres beneath our feet, only to be exposed at the surface, millions of years later, by erosion. Scientists have never been able to track the movements of magma at such great depths… that is, until a team from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) discovered an innovative technique, details of which will be published in the next issue of the journal Nature. … Read more
  • Strategy proposed for preventing diseases of aging
    National Cancer Institute Aging experts urge more focus on disease prevention to promote a long and healthy lifespan. Strategies include a healthy diet, exercise and possibly manipulating molecular pathways that slow aging. Medicine focuses almost entirely on fighting chronic diseases in a piecemeal fashion as symptoms develop. Instead, more efforts should be directed to promoting interventions that have the potential to prevent multiple chronic diseases and extend healthy lifespans.  … Read more
  • 15-year analysis of blue whale range off California finds conflict with shipping lanes
     A comprehensive 15-year analysis of the movements of satellite-tagged blue whales off the West Coast of the United States found that their favored feeding areas are bisected by heavily used shipping lanes, increasing the threat of injury and mortality. The researchers note that moving the shipping lanes off Los Angeles and San Francisco to slightly different areas – at least, during summer and fall when blue whales are most abundant – could significantly decrease the probability of ships striking the whales. A similar relocation of shipping lanes in the Bay of Fundy off eastern Canada lowered the likelihood of vessels striking endangered right whales an estimated 80 percent. … Read more
  • The birth of topological spintronics
    Nitin Samarth, department head of physics at Penn State, works with the molecular beam epitaxy equipment in his lab. He conducts research to design and build new materials needed for radically new kinds of computer chips that could open the door to a new era of super-fast quantum computers. Credit: Fredric Weber, Penn State University     The discovery of a new material combination that could lead to a more efficient approach to computer memory and logic will be described in the journal Nature on July 24, 2014. The research, led by Penn State University and Cornell University physicists, studies “spintorque” in devices that combine a standard magnetic material with a novel material known as a “topological insulator.” The team’s results show that such a scheme can be 10 times more efficient for controlling magnetic memory or logic than any other combination of materials measured to date. … Read more
  • Designing exascale computers
    “Imagine a heart surgeon operating to repair a blocked coronary artery. Someday soon, the surgeon might run a detailed computer simulation of blood flowing through the patient’s arteries, showing how millions of red blood cells jostle and tumble through the small vessels. The simulation would identify the best repair strategy. With a fast enough computer, it could all be done in a few minutes, while the operation is under way.” … Read more
  • How honey bees stay cool
    Honey bees, especially the young, are highly sensitive to temperature and to protect developing bees, adults work together to maintain temperatures within a narrow range. Recently published research led by Philip T. Starks, a biologist at Tufts University’s School of Arts and Sciences, is the first to show that worker bees dissipate excess heat within a hive in process similar to how humans and other mammals cool themselves through their blood vessels and skin. … Read more
  • The physics of lead guitar playing
    String bends, tapping, vibrato and whammy bars are all techniques that add to the distinctiveness of a lead guitarist’s sound, whether it’s Clapton, Hendrix, or BB King. Now guitarist and physicist Dr David Robert Grimes has described the physics underlying these techniques in the journal PLOS ONE. … Read more
  • Spinach could lead to alternative energy more powerful than Popeye
    Purdue physics professor Yulia Pushkar (left) and postdoctoral researcher Lifen Yan work in Pushkar’s laser lab. Pushkar and Yan are part of an international team using spinach to study the proteins involved in photosynthesis. (Purdue University photo/Tim Brouk)     Spinach gave Popeye super strength, but it also holds the promise of a different power for a group of scientists: the ability to convert sunlight into a clean, efficient alternative fuel. Purdue University physicists are part of an international group using spinach to study the proteins involved in photosynthesis, the process by which plants convert the sun’s energy into carbohydrates used to power cellular processes. … Read more
  • A new approach in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence: targeting alien polluters
    Humanity is on the threshold of being able to detect signs of alien life on other worlds. By studying exoplanet atmospheres, we can look for gases like oxygen and methane that only coexist if replenished by life. But those gases come from simple life forms like microbes. What about advanced civilizations? Would they leave any detectable signs? They might, if they spew industrial pollution into the atmosphere. New research by theorists at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) shows that we could spot the fingerprints of certain pollutants under ideal conditions. This would offer a new approach in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI). … Read more
  • A tree may have the answers to renewable energy
    Through an energy conversion process that mimics that of a tree, a University of Wisconsin-Madison materials scientist is making strides in renewable energy technologies for producing hydrogen. Xudong Wang, an assistant professor of materials science and engineering at UW-Madison, recently collaborated with researcher, Dr. Zhiyong Cai, in the U.S. Forest Products Laboratory in Madison on research to use cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) for water splitting, a process that converts solar energy to hydrogen fuel. Wang’s vision is to use cellulose like a sponge “tree” that soaks up water from a lake or ocean. At the top would be a photocatalyst that splits the water into hydrogen and oxygen. … Read more
  • Urban heat boosts some pest populations 200-fold, killing red maples
    New research from North Carolina State University shows that urban “heat islands” are slowly killing red maples in the southeastern United States. One factor is that researchers have found warmer temperatures increase the number of young produced by the gloomy scale insect – a significant tree pest – by 300 percent, which in turn leads to 200 timesmore adult gloomy scales on urban trees. … Read more
  • Calcification in changing oceans explored in special issue of The Biological Bulletin
    What do mollusks, starfish, and corals have in common? Aside from their shared marine habitat, they are all calcifiers—organisms that use calcium from their environment to create hard carbonate skeletons and shells for stability and protection. The July issue of The Biological Bulletin, published by the Marine Biological Laboratory, addresses the challenges faced by these species as ocean composition changes worldwide. … Read more
  • NASA team lays plans to observe new worlds
    It can take decades to mature an astrophysics flagship mission from concept to launch pad. For example, the iconic Hubble Space Telescope — arguably the greatest telescope in history and certainly the most recognized — was proposed in the 1940s. Its development began in the 1970s and it launched in 1990. Similarly, the James Webb Space Telescope will launch in 2018, 23 years after work began on the concept. And if approved for development, the Wide-Field Infrared Space Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA), currently in a study phase, could launch by the mid-2020s. Early versions of this mission were first proposed in the early 2000s.  … Read more
  • Museum workers pronounce dobsonfly found in China, largest aquatic insect
    Credit: Insect Museum of West China Workers with the Insect Museum of West China, who were recently given several very large dragon-fly looking insects, with long teeth, by locals in a part of Sichuan, have declared it, a giant dobsonfly the largest known aquatic insect in the world alive today. The find displaces the previous record holder, the South American helicopter damselfly, by just two centimeters. The dobsonfly is common (there are over 220 species of them) in China, India, Africa, South America and some other parts of Asia, but until now, no specimens as large as those recently found in China have been known. The largest specimens in the found group had a wingspan of 21 centimeters, making it large enough to cover the entire face of a human adult. Locals don’t have to worry too much about injury from the insects, however, as officials from the museum report that larger males’ mandibles are so huge in proportion to their bodies that they are relatively weak—incapable of piercing human skin. They can kick up a stink, however, as they are able to spray an offensive odor when threatened. Read more at: Phys.org … Read more
  • IHEP in China has ambitions for Higgs factory
    Who will lay claim to having the world’s largest particle smasher?. Could China become the collider capital of the world? Questions tease answers, following a news story in Nature on Tuesday. Proposals for two particle accelerators could accelerate China itself as a scientific leader, upstaging the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Europe’s famous particle-physics laboratory, where the LHC is the world’s largest particle collider. … Read more
  • Smarter than a first-grader?
    Researcher Corina Logan with a great-tailed grackle (left) and a night heron at the Santa Barbara Zoo. The zoo is one of the sites where Logan is gathering data to compare and contrast the cognitive abilities of grackles and New Caledonian crows. Photo Credit: SONIA FERNANDEZ   In Aesop’s fable about the crow and the pitcher, a thirsty bird happens upon a vessel of water, but when he tries to drink from it, he finds the water level out of his reach. Not strong enough to knock over the pitcher, the bird drops pebbles into it — one at a time — until the water level rises enough for him to drink his fill. … Read more
  • The Beast – a solar powered e-bike
    The Beast: a solar powered electric bike. It acts like a scooter and has full functional pedals that make it street legal and it has wide tires that allow you go on paved roads, dirt roads and off road. Also it charges while you are riding, working or resting. … Read more
  • Knowledgeable consumers more likely to buy when given fewer options
    The degree to which consumers perceive themselves to be knowledgeable about a product influences the likelihood that they will buy a particular product, researchers find in a series of studies published inPsychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. … Read more
  • Massive neutrinos and new standard cosmological model: No concordance yet
    The research group demonstrates that adding such massive neutrinos to the standard model does not really explain all datasets. Credit: The Milky Way, NASA. Neutrinos, also known as ‘ghost particles’ because they barely interact with other particles or their surroundings, are massless particles according to the standard model of particle physics. However, there is a lot of evidence that their mass is in fact non-zero, but it remains unmeasured. In cosmology, neutrinos are suspected to make up a fraction —small but important— of the mysterious dark matter, which represents 90% of the mass of the galaxy. Modifying the standard cosmological model in order to include fairly massive neutrinos does not explain all the physical observations simultaneously. … Read more
  • Share button may share your browsing history, too
    The researchers traced 95 percent of canvas fingerprinting scripts back to share buttons provided by AddThis, the world’s largest content sharing platform. 1 in 18 of the world’s top 100,000 websites track users without their consent using a previously undetected cookie-like tracking mechanism embedded in ‘share’ buttons. A new study by researchers at KU Leuven and Princeton University provides the first large-scale investigation of the mechanism and is the first to confirm its use on actual websites. … Read more
  • Simulated ‘engine of explosion’ observed in supernova remnant
    The entropy of the inner 250 kilometers of a 15 solar-mass star during a 3D simulation of a core-collapse supernova using the CHIMERA code. Large-scale distortion of the supernova shock can be seen, along with smaller-scale convection. Back in 2003, researchers using the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility’s (OLCF’s) first supercomputer, Phoenix, started out with a bang. Astrophysicists studying core-collapse supernovae—dying massive stars that violently explode after running out of fuel—asked themselves what mechanism triggers explosion and a fusion chain reaction that releases all the elements found in the universe, including those that make up the matter around us? … Read more
  • Researchers find greenhouse gas emissions from shale gas similar to that for conventional natural gas
    Derrick and platform of drilling gas wells in Marcellus Shale – Pennsylvania. Credit: Wikipedia/ CC BY-SA 3.0 A team of researchers with the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis, in the U.S. has found that greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that occur during the lifecycle of shale gas when used as an energy source is roughly equal to that which occurs during the life cycle of conventional natural gas. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes how they used a meta-analytical procedure they call harmonization to arrive at estimates for emissions of GHG due to extraction and use of shale gas. Extracting gas from shale rock involves injecting fluid into rock areas deep underground, which creates channels through which the gas can be extracted—the technique is known as hydraulic fracturing, which has been shortened, sometimes derisively, to fracking. Once the gas is removed, cement is injected into the site to prevent the injected liquid from entering groundwater—the gas is then processed for use as an energy source, generally by burning it. Read more at: Phys.org … Read more
  • A decade of improvements on the reference green alga genome
    Since the generation of the first draft sequence, DOE JGI researchers have been improving a key algal genome. The high-quality genome sequence of the tiny single-celled alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has proved useful for researchers studying photosynthesis and cell motility. … Read more
  • Photosensitive version of amiloride allows regulating the function of sodium-specific ion channels with light
    The diuretic agent amiloride is used for the treatment of high blood pressure. LMU researchers have now synthesized a photosensitive version, which allows regulating the function of sodium-specific ion channels with light. … Read more
  • Sixth-grader proves invasive species of ocean fish can thrive in low saline water
    Antennata Lionfish, picture taken in Zoo Schönbrunn, Vienna, Austria. Credit: Christian Mehlführer/Wikipedia \Twelve year old Lauren Arrington of Jupiter Florida has demonstrated that sometimes the best science is the most simple—to find out if the invasive species, lionfish could live in low saline water, she caught some and put them in low saline water to see how they did. Turns out, they did just fine, proving what she’d suspected, that the fish can thrive in the low saline estuaries that are common around the area where she lives. Up till now, scientists had believed the fish was not a threat to estuary waters, as it could only survive in the ocean.   … Read more
  • Astrophysicists model the formation of the oldest-known star in our galaxy
    The illustration shows projections of the gas density, temperature and the fraction of ionized carbon in the central region where the star forms, in simulations with different abundances of the heavy elements, from 0.01 to 0.0001 times the solar value. The results show that a strong transition occurs for a carbon abundance of 0.01 times the solar value, providing a pathway for the formation of low-mass stars. Credit: Institute for Astrophysics Göttingen A team of researchers led by Dr. Stefano Bovino at the Institute for Astrophysics Göttingen (IAG) has conducted high-resolution simulations investigating the formation of the oldest-known star in our galaxy, SMSS J031300.36-670839.3, on a supercomputer of the North-German Supercomputing Alliance. Using the star’s abundance patterns, the scientists have performed cosmological simulations which include the dynamics of gas and dark matter as well as the chemical evolution. From this simulation, the scientists expect to obtain an improved understanding of the transition from the first to the second generation of stars in the universe. The results of their study were published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters. Read more at: Phys.org   … Read more
  • Alaska frogs reach record lows in extreme temperature survival
    Freezing and thawing might not be good for the average steak, but it seems to help wood frogs each fall as they prepare to survive Alaska’s winter cold. “Alaska wood frogs spend more time freezing and thawing outside than a steak does in your freezer and the frog comes back to life in the spring in better shape than the steak,” said Don Larson, University of Alaska Fairbanks graduate student and lead author on a recent paper demonstrating that freeze tolerance in Alaska wood frogs is more extreme than previously thought. … Read more
  • New study reveals vulnerability of sharks as collateral damage in commercial fishing
     new study that examined the survival rates of 12 different shark species when captured as unintentional bycatch in commercial longline fishing operations found large differences in survival rates across the 12 species, with bigeye thresher, dusky, and scalloped hammerhead being the most vulnerable. The study, led by researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and UM Abess Center for Ecosystem Science and Policy, provides new information to consider for future conservation measures for sharks in the Northwest Atlantic. The unintentional capture of a fish species when targeting another species, known as bycatch, is one of the largest threats facing many marine fish populations. … Read more
  • The nostalgia effect: Do consumers spend more when thinking about the past?
    Say you are out clothes shopping and you spot something that brings you back to a special time from your childhood when you were surrounded by friends and family. Suddenly, you find yourself purchasing an expensive shirt that makes you feel like a kid again. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, we’re more likely to spend money when we’re feeling nostalgic. … Read more
  • You deserve it! Are consumers more likely to buy unique products when made to feel special?
    Graduating from college is an important life event often attributed to being smart and working hard. Many people celebrate this milestone achievement by buying themselves an expensive gift or taking a dream vacation. A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research shows that consumers who attribute their successes to internal character traits rather than hard work are more likely to select unique products. … Read more
  • Bats use polarized light to navigate
    Scientists have discovered that greater mouse-eared bats use polarisation patterns in the sky to navigate – the first mammal that’s known to do this. The bats use the way the Sun’s light is scattered in the atmosphere at sunset to calibrate their internal magnetic compass, which helps them to fly in the right direction, a study published in Nature Communications has shown. Despite this breakthrough, researchers have no idea how they manage to detect polarised light. … Read more
  • Meerkats’ sinister side is secret to their success, study shows
    The darker side of meerkats – which sees them prevent their daughters from breeding, and kill their grandchildren – is explained in a new study. Research into the desert creatures – which live in groups with a dominant breeding pair and many adult helpers – shows that the alpha female can flourish when it maintains the sole right to breed. … Read more
  • New device based on fly’s freakishly acute hearing may find applications in futuristic hearing aids
     Even within a phylum so full of mean little creatures, the yellow-colored Ormia ochracea fly is distinguished among other arthropods for its cruelty — at least to crickets. Native to the southeastern U.S. states and Central America, the fly is a most predatory sort of parasite. It swoops onto the back of a singing male cricket, deposits a smear of larvae, and leaves its wicked brood to invade, kill and consume the cricket from inside out. … Read more
  • A new multi-bit ‘spin’ for MRAM storage
     Interest in magnetic random access memory (MRAM) is escalating, thanks to demand for fast, low-cost, nonvolatile, low-consumption, secure memory devices. MRAM, which relies on manipulating the magnetization of materials for data storage rather than electronic charges, boasts all of these advantages as an emerging technology, but so far it hasn’t been able to match flash memory in terms of storage density. … Read more
  • New study shows therapeutic bacteria prevent obesity in mice
    A probiotic that prevents obesity could be on the horizon. Bacteria that produce a therapeutic compound in the gut inhibit weight gain, insulin resistance and other adverse effects of a high-fat diet in mice, Vanderbilt University investigators have discovered. … Read more
  • Enhanced NIST instrument enables high-speed chemical imaging of tissues
    A research team from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), working with the Cleveland Clinic, has demonstrated a dramatically improved technique for analyzing biological cells and tissues based on characteristic molecular vibration “signatures.” The new NIST technique is an advanced form of the widely used spontaneous Raman spectroscopy, but one that delivers signals that are 10,000 times stronger than obtained from spontaneous Raman scattering, and 100 times stronger than obtained from comparable “coherent Raman” instruments, and uses a much larger portion of the vibrational spectrum of interest to cell biologists.* … Read more
  • Technique simplifies the creation of high-tech crystals
    Highly purified crystals that split light with uncanny precision are key parts of high-powered lenses, specialized optics and, potentially, computers that manipulate light instead of electricity. But producing these crystals by current techniques, such as etching them with a precise beam of electrons, is often extremely difficult and expensive. … Read more
  • ‘Comb on a chip’ powers new atomic clock design
    Researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have demonstrated a new design for an atomic clock that is based on a chip-scale frequency comb, or a microcomb. … Read more
  • Radio frequency ID tags on honey bees reveal hive dynamics
    Scientists attached radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags to hundreds of individual honey bees and tracked them for several weeks. The effort yielded two discoveries: Some foraging bees are much busier than others; and if those busy bees disappear, others will take their place. … Read more
  • Quantum leap in lasers brightens future for quantum computing
    Dartmouth scientists and their colleagues have devised a breakthrough laser that uses a single artificial atom to generate and emit particles of light. The laser may play a crucial role in the development of quantum computers, which are predicted to eventually outperform today’s most powerful supercomputers. … Read more
  • Study finds potential genetic link between epilepsy and neurodegenerative disorders
    A recent scientific discovery showed that mutations in prickle genes cause epilepsy, which in humans is a brain disorder characterized by repeated seizures over time. However, the mechanism responsible for generating prickle-associated seizures was unknown. A new University of Iowa study, published online July 14 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, reveals a novel pathway in the pathophysiology of epilepsy. UI researchers have identified the basic cellular mechanism that goes awry in prickle mutant flies, leading to the epilepsy-like seizures. … Read more
  • The dopamine transporter: Researchers study a common link between addiction and neurological disease
    Researchers use TACC’s Stampede supercomputer to study a common link between addiction and neurological disease Recent published research in the Journal of Clinical Investigationdemonstrates how changes in dopamine signaling and dopamine transporter function are linked to neurological and psychiatric diseases, including early-onset Parkinsonism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). … Read more

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