New medicine will treat heart failure with unprecedented effectiveness

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Posted February 15, 2017

Our hearts are working hard pumping all that blood and sometimes they start to get worn out prematurely. Patients of heart failure have to take medicines all the time and some have to undergo heart transplant. But soon there may be a new treatment, because scientists from University of Alberta discovered a molecule, which can restore balance needed for a healthy heart.

New medicine will improve health of people with transplanted hearts as well. Image credit: Hikmet Gümüş via Wikimedia, CC BY-SA 3.0

A disbalance in certain pathways leads to a heart failure. And thus, this molecule, known as angiotensin converting enzyme 2 , can restore this balance even in patients, who underwent heart transplants. Scientists conducted this research genetic mapping technology and found that the renin-angiotensin system has a role in development of both acute and chronic heart failure. This system regulates the body’s sodium balance, fluid volume and blood pressure. All this research allowed scientists to get to know the mechanisms behind heart failure with unprecedented precision.

When scientists found the molecule that could restore balance in the main pathways that play a role in the development of a heart failure, they created a drug. It went through all the necessary testing and some improvements and now is almost ready for commercial launching. Scientists say that one of the main innovations from the research project could be beneficial for clinical use too. Mapping technology allows providing exact doses needed for a specific case.

The two main causes of heart failures are heart attacks and high blood pressure. Weakened heart cannot serve its function very well and health of the person starts declining. In some cases, heart transplant is needed, in other – heart failure has to be constantly addressed with medication. However, all current treatments have significant drawbacks.

The new medicine, based on angiotensin converting enzyme 2 molecule, is likely to solve many problems and improve quality of life of thousands of people. In fact, it will improve chances of survival. However, it is still 3-5 years away.

Source: ualberta.ca

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