Job of a truck driver is increasingly dangerous, but business managers do not see it

Share via AddThis
Posted February 7, 2017

Losing your job is not fun at all, especially if it is the only source of income for the family. However, losing your life is worse. This seems to be obvious for most of people, but a new study in Australia found that country‘s truck drivers work overtime and carry unsafe loads just to secure their job. These are interesting findings, because logistic business seems to be well regulated.

Trucks are extremely important for our economies, but drivers feel that they are working in dangerous conditions. Image credit: Teddy Wade, U.S. Army via Wikimedia, Public Domain

There are tons of laws and health and safety regulation regarding the work of the truck driver. However, it is still a very demanding profession to have. On one hand, it is certainly not easy to remain focused on driving for long periods of time, but on the other, truck drivers have to keep in mind competition in their workplace as well. Taking too long may cost you a job, especially if there is someone who can do the job quicker. People in charge of truck companies say that they encourage safety, but truck drivers revealed that they feel like they are constantly in danger.

During the research, many truck drivers said that they suffer injuries and daily near-misses. Not only it is physically dangerous, but it is also extremely stressful. Because drivers and businessmen are providing different information about the working environment, scientists think that the problem actually is within communication between employers and employees. Interestingly, society knows that being a long distance truck driver is a rather dangerous job. However, not so many people know that many fatalities and serious injuries occur off the road. For example, many truck drivers are harmed in truck yards and depots.

Low speed collisions take a major part of the workplace injuries of truck drivers. For example, some people get caught between their truck and a trailer they are trying to hitch. Dr Sharron O’Neill, author of the study, said: “Of great concern is the fact that while individual incidents are on their way down, incident severity is trending upwards. This suggests the industry is getting much better at managing the minor risks but is losing sight of some of the major ones”.

Researchers hope that results will be taken into account when time will come to improve safety regulations. More importantly, they should make supervisors and truck driver communicate more closely.

Source: unsw.edu.au

Comment this news or article



Featured news from related categories:

61,074 science & technology articles

Follow us

Facebook   Twitter   Pinterest   StumbleUpon   Plurk
Google+   Tumblr   Delicious   RSS   Newsletter via Email