Scientists: Matter and their antimatter counterparts are similar

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Posted September 10, 2015

If there’s one thing in science that is constantly dividing scientists, it is the truth behind antimatters’ existence and their many still-unexplored characteristics. For some, these particles remain nonexistent in their book, while others believe that they are indeed existent particles that can be seen by the naked eye. Others, however, say they are not different from their matter counterparts.

A cut-away schematic of the Penning trap system used by BASE. The experiment receives antiprotons from CERN's AD; negative hydrogen ions are formed during injection into the apparatus. The set-up works with only a pair of particles at a time, while a cloud of a few hundred others are held in the reservoir trap, for future use. Here, an antiproton is in the measurement trap, while the negative hydyrogen ion is in held by the downstream park electrode. When the antiproton has been measured, it is moved to the upstream park electrode and the hydrogen ion is brought in to the measurement trap. This is repeated thousands of times, enabling a high-precision comparison of the charge-to-mass ratios of the two particles. Credit: CERN

A cut-away schematic of the Penning trap system used by BASE. The experiment receives antiprotons from CERN’s AD; negative hydrogen ions are formed during injection into the apparatus. The set-up works with only a pair of particles at a time, while a cloud of a few hundred others are held in the reservoir trap, for future use. Here, an antiproton is in the measurement trap, while the negative hydyrogen ion is in held by the downstream park electrode. When the antiproton has been measured, it is moved to the upstream park electrode and the hydrogen ion is brought in to the measurement trap. This is repeated thousands of times, enabling a high-precision comparison of the charge-to-mass ratios of the two particles. Credit: CERN

A group of astrophysics published a study in the science journal Nature, revealing that antimatters and matters are a complete mirror images of themselves, except for their electrical charge.

Research head Stefan Ulmer said knowing the physical characteristics of these particles would be important in understanding the real history of the universe.

“This is an important issue, because it helps us to understand why we live in a universe that has practically no antimatter, despite the fact that the Big Bang must have led to the creation of both. If we had found violations of CPT, it would mean that matter and antimatter might have different properties—for example that antiprotons might decay faster than protons—but we have found within quite strict limits that the charge-to-mass ratios are the same,” he said.

The scientists received antiprotons and negative hydrogen ions in lieu of protons from the Antiproton Decelerator. After which, they enclosed the contained pairs of single antiproton-hydrogen ion through a magnetic Penning to slow them down to ultra-low energies.

The study is encouraged by the fact that the universe is mostly made up of matters, which in theory must not be the case. Scientists have long believed that the Big Bang theory, which is thought to have created the universe some 13 billion years ago, has produced equal amounts of antimatter and matter. Hence, having similar characteristics, antimatter and matter may have collided with each other during those “days.”

“So, if matter and antimatter appear to be mirror images of each other in every respect save their electrical charge, there might not be much any of either type of matter left — matter and antimatter annihilate when they encounter each other,” Charles Choi of Live Science explained.

“What we found is that the charge-to-mass ratio is identical to within just 69 parts per trillion. This measurement has four times higher energy resolution than previous measurements of proton-antiproton pairs, and further constrains the possibility of violations of CPT invariance,” said Ulmer.

CPT invariance, in physics, is a symmetry in a physical experiment saying that something is conserved, or remains constant, during the experiment.

Several months ago, technology innovator Thunder Energies Corporation (OTCQB: TNRG) revealed that they also had to bank on early studies on matter to come up with a revolutionary technology that could prove the existence of antimatter particles.

Dr. Ruggero Maria Santilli, the inventor of the antimatter-detecting Santilli Telescope, said that he capitalized on many existing theories—including those of Newton, Galileo, and Einstein—to put up the foundations of what soon became the blueprint of his revolutionary telescope. He also used the Galileo principle so that the Santilli could also perform regular telescope functions, which is detecting matter-light.

Today, antimatters’ existence and real significance in the history of the universe remain a favorite topic for debates among scientists and amateur space enthusiasts. But since it encourages them to delve deeper into its unknown features, it is not difficult to say that the divide is beneficial to the industry. So let the debates continue.

Written by Emma Cox



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