Beyond the Moore’s Law: Nanocomputing using nanowire tiles

Share via AddThis
Posted January 28, 2014
Beyond the Moore's Law: Nanocomputing using nanowire tiles
The nanowire finite-state machine (in false color) fabricated from assembled nanowires occupies the small central region of the chip with all other features corresponding to metal lines used for testing the integrated system. Credit: Jun Yao and Charles Lieber, Harvard University.
An interdisciplinary team of scientists and engineers from The MITRE Corporation and Harvard University have taken key steps toward ultra-small electronic computer systems that push beyond the imminent end of Moore’s Law, which states that the device density and overall processing power for computers will double every two to three years. In a paper that will appear this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes how they designed and assembled, from the bottom up, a functioning, ultra-tiny control computer that is the densest nanoelectronic system ever built.

The ultra-small, ultra-low-power control processor—termed a nanoelectronic finite-state machine or “nanoFSM”—is smaller than a human nerve cell. It is composed of hundreds of nanowire transistors, each of which is a switch about ten-thousand times thinner than a human hair. The nanowire transistors use very little power because they are “nonvolatile.” That is, the switches remember whether they are on or off, even when no power is supplied to them.

In the nanoFSM, these nanoswitches are assembled and organized into circuits on several “tiles.”

Read more at: Phys.org

Comment this news or article



Featured news from related categories:

61,009 science & technology articles

Follow us

Facebook   Twitter   Pinterest   StumbleUpon   Plurk
Google+   Tumblr   Delicious   RSS   Newsletter via Email