Groovy! Martian Moon Shows Off Its Weird Stripes In New Video

Share via AddThis
Posted on December 27, 2013

After seeing Phobos imaged from the surface of the Red Planet by Mars Curiosity, now we’re lucky to get a close-up treat: here’s a video showing Mars Express images of the Martian moon over the last 10 years. The images reveal mysterious grooves running through the small moon, which is 13.5-miles (22 kilometers) in diameter, and scientists still aren’t sure what’s going on.

“The moon’s parallel sets of grooves are perhaps the most striking feature, along with the giant 9 km-wide Stickney impact crater that dominates one face,” the European Space Agency wrote.

“The origin of the moon’s grooves is a subject of much debate. One idea assumes that the crater chains are associated with impact events on the moon itself. Another idea suggests they result from Phobos moving through streams of debris thrown up from impacts 6000 km away on the surface of Mars, with each ‘family’ of grooves corresponding to a different impact event.”

The streaked and stained surface of Phobos. (Image: NASA)

The streaked and stained surface of Phobos. (Image: NASA)

Source: Universe Today, story by Elizabeth Howell



43,151 science & technology articles

Categories

Our Articles (see all)

General News

Follow us

Facebook   Twitter   Pinterest   StumbleUpon   Plurk
Google+   Tumblr   Delicious   RSS   Newsletter via Email

Featured Video (see all)


Why wet dogs stink (and other canine chemistry)
They’re our best four-legged friends, and they’re the stars of many an Internet video. No, not cats. In…

Featured Image (see all)


How plants put up a fight
They might look weedy but plants know a thing or two about defence. When confronted by harmful bacteria,…