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Music Training May Boost Young Brains

Posted on November 14, 2013

Playing a musical instrument can cause fundamental changes in a young person’s brain, shaping both how it functions and how it is physically structured, researchers say.

A trio of studies presented this week at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, in San Diego, suggested that musical training can accomplish the following:

  • Improve a person’s ability to effectively process information from several senses at once,
  • Affect the way a young person’s brain develops if they begin playing music prior to age 7,
  • Enhance connectivity between the parts of the brain associated with creativity and improvisation.

All these findings ultimately could lead to improved therapies for people with brain injuries or learning disabilities, Dr. Gottfried Schlaug, director of the Music and Neuroimaging Laboratory at Harvard Medical School, said in a Monday afternoon news conference.

“Music might provide an alternative access into a broken or dysfunctional system within the brain,” said Schlaug, an associate professor of neurology at Harvard. “Music has the unique ability to go through alternative channels and connect different sections of the brain.”

The first study, conducted by Canadian researchers, asked trained musicians and non-musicians to respond to sound and touch sensations at the same time.

Two sounds were delivered at the same time a person received one touch sensation, which was intended to create the perceptual illusion that the person actually had received two touch sensations.

Since musicians have to simultaneously work their instrument, read sheet music and listen to the tones they produce, the researchers predicted that they would be better able to sort out sound from touch.

This prediction proved correct. Non-musicians fell for the illusion, but musicians did not, researcher Julie Roy, of the University of Montreal, said during the news conference.

“Musicians are able to ignore the auditory stimuli and only report what they are feeling,” Roy said, adding that this is solid evidence of an improved ability to process information from more than one sense at the same time.

Read more at: MedlinePlus

   
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