‘Unequivocal’ evidence that global warming is man-made

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Posted October 14, 2013
A report from a panel of global scientists has offered the strongest evidence yet that climate change is a direct result of human behaviour.

 
'Unequivocal' evidence that global warming is man-made
Fossilised and live coral offer vital information on the effect of climate change on organisms.
More than 600 scientists worldwide contributed to the Fifth Assessment Report published last month by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which comes under the auspices of the United Nations.

The panel will further report on the biological consequences of global temperature rise, change in weather patterns and the rising temperature of oceans early next year.

Museum climate change research group

Scientists throughout the Museum continue to research the effects of climate change on the natural world in projects involving specimens as wide ranging as orchids, corals, salmon and trout, fossil shark teeth, seaweed, midges and butterflies.

In addition, an informal group of Museum scientists meet regularly to discuss climate change in general and to identify samples and specimens stored in the Museum collection that could be valuable to future climate change research.

Museum invertebrates researcher Dr Kenneth Johnson, who specialises in corals, said that even though we can’t physically measure the past climate, specimens such as fossils and shells act as proxies, or representatives of a time and place.

Read more at: Phys.org



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