Russian spacewalkers encounter faulty equipment

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Posted August 23, 2013
Russian spacewalkers encounter faulty equipment

Russian spacewalkers encounter faulty equipment
In this image from video made available by NASA, cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin, left, and Aleksandr Misurkin wave a Russian flag near the end of their spacewalk outside the International Space Station on Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013. (AP Photo/NASA)

A pair of spacewalking Russian cosmonauts installed a new telescope mount on the International Space Station on Thursday, despite a flaw in the device.

Fyodor Yurchikhin and Aleksandr Misurkin—making their spacewalk in under a week—initially gave up trying to plug in the platform for a yet-to-be-launched telescope.

Yurchikhin and Misurkin reported that the base of the platform appeared to be misaligned because it wasn’t assembled properly on the ground. The problem could prevent the future telescope from pointing in the right direction.

But engineers with Russian Mission Control determined the misalignment could be overcome at a later date.

The swiveling platform will hold an optical telescope that will be launched in November and installed by spacewalking cosmonauts.

The spacewalkers also unfurled and waved a Russian flag that they took out in honor of Russia’s Flag Day. “Now we can see the flag of our Motherland,” one of the cosmonauts said in an impromptu speech.

The cosmonauts also ran into some difficulty tightening some antenna covers.

Because of a flyaway cover earlier this week, the cosmonauts double-checked the remaining shields to make sure they were secure. At least two were loose, one by a lot.

NASA said the lost cover posed no risk to the space station.

Read more at: Phys.org



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