Deciphering structure of NatA, an enzyme complex that modifies most human proteins

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Posted on August 5, 2013

A team of researchers from Philadelphia and Norway has determined the structure of an enzyme complex that modifies one end of most human proteins and is made at elevated levels in numerous forms of cancer. A study in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, led by researchers at The Wistar Institute, depicts the structure and the means of action of a protein complex called NatA. Their findings, they believe, will allow them to create an inhibitor—a potential drug—that could knock out NatA in order to curb the growth of cancer cells.

 

“NatA appears essential for the growth of cells and their ability to divide, and we can see elevated production of this enzyme in many forms of cancer” said Ronen Marmorstein, Ph.D., senior author, Hilary Koprowski, M.D. Professor, and leader of The Wistar Institute Cancer Center’s Gene Expression and Regulation program. “Obviously, this is a particularly appealing drug target and we are currently leveraging our recent understanding of how the protein works to develop small molecules that will bind to and inactivate NatA.”

NatA is a member of a family of N-terminal acetyltransferase (NAT) enzymes (or enzyme complexes) that modify proteins in order to control their behavior—for example by turning proteins on, telling proteins where to move, and tagging proteins or the cell for destruction.

According to Marmorstein, NatA works with an amazing specificity for a particular sequence of amino acids—the individual building blocks of proteins—and unraveling the roots of that specificity has proven an alluring puzzle for scientists.

Read more at: Phys.org



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