700,000 year old horse genome sequenced

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Posted June 27, 2013
Dr. Ludovic Orlando and Professor Eske Willerslev, both of the Centre for GeoGenetics at the University of Copenhagen, have sequenced the genome of the oldest horse ever found on Earth. Bone fragments from a 700,000 year old nag excavated in Yucon, Canada had enough DNA in them to reveal new aspects of the evolutionary history of the horse. Credit: Photo: Uffe Wilken/University of Copenhagen

Dr. Ludovic Orlando and Professor Eske Willerslev, both of the Centre for GeoGenetics at the University of Copenhagen, have sequenced the genome of the oldest horse ever found on Earth. Bone fragments from a 700,000 year old nag excavated in Yucon, Canada had enough DNA in them to reveal new aspects of the evolutionary history of the horse. Credit: Photo: Uffe Wilken/University of Copenhagen

It is nothing short of a world record in DNA research that scientists at the Centre for GeoGenetics at the Natural History Museum of Denmark (University of Copenhagen) have hit. They have sequenced the so far oldest genome from a prehistoric creature. They have done so by sequencing and analyzing short pieces of DNA molecules preserved in bone-remnants from a horse that had been kept frozen for the last 700.000 years in the permafrost of Yukon, Canada. By tracking the genomic changes that transformed prehistoric wild horses into domestic breeds, the researchers have revealed the genetic make-up of modern horses with unprecedented details. The spectacular results are now published in the international scientific journal Nature.

DNA molecules can survive in fossils well after an organism dies. Not as whole chromosomes, but as short pieces that could be assembled back together, like a puzzle. Sometimes enough molecules survive so that the full genome sequence of extinct species could be resurrected and over the last years, the full genome sequence of a few ancient humans and archaic hominins has been characterized. But so far, none dated back to before 70,000 years.

Now Dr. Ludovic Orlando and Professor Eske Willerslev from the Centre for GeoGenetics have beaten this DNA-record by about 10 times. Thereby the two researchers – in collaboration with Danish and international colleagues – have been able to track major genomic changes over the last 700.000 years of evolution of the horse lineage.

Rread more at: Phys.org



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