A better route to hydrocarbazoles

Share via AddThis
Posted on June 26, 2013

abetterroute[1]

A new chemical process developed by researchers at Kanazawa University provides an efficient way of synthesizing diverse organic compounds. This research is also described in the inaugural June 2013 issue of the Kanazawa University Research Bulletin: http://www.kanazawa-u.ac.jp/research_bulletin/index.html

Jun-ichi Matsuo and co-workers in the School of Pharmaceutical Sciences aimed to produce a wide variety of aromatic compounds called hydrocarbazoles, which are found in many natural substances such as strychnine. Hydrocarbazoles contain a benzene ring linked by a six-membered carbon ring and a five-membered carbon ring containing nitrogen.

Various methods exist for synthesizing hydrocarbazoles by reacting electron-accepting compounds, called enophiles, with indoles – common aromatic structures that are found in flower scents. Because this reaction involves the addition of a cyclic carbon ring, it is called cycloaddition.

Previous cycloaddition methods have been restricted to certain combinations of indoles and enophiles. Moreover, it has been difficult to control exactly where on the molecules the bonds will be formed, and thus what exact chemical structure will come out.

The new process developed by Matsuo and co-workers involves a reaction of cyclobutanones with so-called Lewis acids – molecules that can accept two electrons – to produce an intermediary molecule that has positively- and negatively-charged parts, but zero charge overall. This intermediary can react with many different indoles to produce hydrocarbazoles.

Read more at: Phys.org



39,045 science & technology articles

Categories

Our Articles (see all)

General News

Follow us

Facebook   Twitter   Pinterest   StumbleUpon   Plurk
Google+   Tumblr   Delicious   RSS   Newsletter via Email

Featured Video (see all)


Sunglasses on demand
Apart from their style, sunglasses have changed very little in the last few decades. Photochromic lenses that change…

Featured Image (see all)


Solar Eclipse From the International Space Station
Expedition 43 Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti took a series of photographs of the March 20, 2015 solar eclipse…