Stellar winds may electrify exoplanets

Share via AddThis
Posted on June 5, 2013

The strangest class of exoplanets found to date might be even stranger than astronomers have thought. A new model suggests that they are partially heated by electric currents linked to their host stars. Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU) astronomer Dr. Derek Buzasi has proposed a model in which electric currents arising from the interaction between the planet’s magnetic field and the hot charged wind from the star flow through the interior of the planet, heating it like an electric toaster.

 

Many of the planets found by the Kepler mission are of a type known as “hot Jupiters.” While about the same size as Jupiter in our own solar system, these exoplanets are located much closer to their host stars than even Mercury is to our Sun, meaning that their atmospheres are heated to temperatures of thousands of degrees.

One problem scientists have had in understanding the hot Jupiters is that many are inflated to sizes even larger than expected for planets so close to their stars. Explanations for the “puffiness” of these exoplanets generally involve some kind of extra heating for the planet. Proposed sources for the extra heat have included tides and interactions between the high-speed winds and magnetic fields expected on these planets, but none of these models successfully explains the observation that more magnetically active stars tend to have puffier hot Jupiters orbiting around them.

“This kind of electric heating doesn’t happen very effectively on planets in our solar system because their outer atmospheres are cold and don’t conduct electricity very well,” says Buzasi. “But heat up the atmosphere by moving the planet closer to its star and now very large currents can flow, which delivers extra heat to the deep interior of the planet—just where we need it.” More magnetically active stars have more energetic winds and would provide larger currents and more heat to their planets.

Read more at: Phys.org



39,022 science & technology articles

Categories

Our Articles (see all)

General News

Follow us

Facebook   Twitter   Pinterest   StumbleUpon   Plurk
Google+   Tumblr   Delicious   RSS   Newsletter via Email

Featured Video (see all)


Sunglasses on demand
Apart from their style, sunglasses have changed very little in the last few decades. Photochromic lenses that change…

Featured Image (see all)


Solar Eclipse From the International Space Station
Expedition 43 Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti took a series of photographs of the March 20, 2015 solar eclipse…