30,845 science & technology articles
 

Map of hateful tweets shows hotspots are mostly in eastern half of U.S.

Posted on May 20, 2013

Tweets containing hateful words are coming in larger proportions from people living in the eastern half of the United States, according to a new map that tracked hate speech on Twitter.

 

“How much hate people are broadcasting online is a little shocking and upsetting,” said Monica Stephens, assistant professor of geography at Humboldt State University in Arcata, Calif.

The map is based on tweets that were scanned for hate words that are homophobic, racist or demeaning to people with disabilities.

“I think the words themselves are shocking when you realize how much volume there is,” Stephens added. “We were dealing with over 150,000 times that these words were used in slightly under 10 months.”

The map uses data from the DOLLY Project at the University of Kentucky, which provides an archive of tweets that have been tagged with a location. The tweets were from June 2012 to April 2013.

Stephens had the help of three geography students – Amelia Egle, a junior; Miles Ross, a senior; and Matt Eiben, a graduate student – to analyze the tweets and build the map.

The students read them to determine whether they were hateful, positive or neutral.

“It was hard sometimes to make that decision,” Egle said. “There were definitely some racist and shocking statements that you aren’t expecting at first.”

Growing up in California, Ross said he heard racism a lot, but mostly in closed circles.

“It was surprising they would actually say these words to begin with and also have a spacial location attached to it,” he said.

Geotagged tweets are a small percentage of total Twitter traffic. People have to opt in to provide the geographic location from where they are tweeting. But those that are geotagged provide a good representation of what is being tweeted, Johnson said.

Read more at: Phys.org

This entry was posted in Other social sciences news, Web news and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

Categories

Related Topics

Our Articles (see all)

Trending

General News

Follow us

Facebook   Twitter   Pinterest   StumbleUpon   Plurk
Google+   Tumblr   Delicious   RSS   Newsletter via Email