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Internet in ‘coma’ as Iran election looms

Posted on May 20, 2013
Iranians surf the net at a cyber at a cafe in Tehran on in 2011. Iran is tightening control of the Internet ahead of next month's presidential election, mindful of violent street protests that social networkers inspired last time around over claims of fraud, users and experts say.

Iranians surf the net at a cyber at a cafe in Tehran on in 2011. Iran is tightening control of the Internet ahead of next month’s presidential election, mindful of violent street protests that social networkers inspired last time around over claims of fraud, users and experts say.

Iran is tightening control of the Internet ahead of next month’s presidential election, mindful of violent street protests that social networkers inspired last time around over claims of fraud, users and experts say.

The authorities deny such claims, but have not explained exactly why service has become slower.

Businesses, banks and even state organisations are not spared by the widespread disruption in the Internet, local media say.

“The Internet is in a coma,” said the Ghanoon daily in a report in early this month.

“It only happens in Iran: the election comes, the Internet goes,” it said, quoting a tweetin Farsi.

Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and numerous other sites, including thousands of Western ones, have been censored in Iran since massive street demonstrations that followed the re-election of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad in 2009.

Those protests—stifled by a heavy-handed crackdown that led to numerous arrests and even deaths—were instigated online and observers say the authorities are choking the Internet to prevent a recurrence.

One DVD vendor, who sells illegal copies of Western movies downloaded online, said “you can forget about downloading stuff; the bandwidth drops every other minute.”

A network supervisor at a major Internet service provider in Tehran said his company had been unable to address complaints about slower speeds, particularly accessing pages using the HTTPS secure communications protocol.

“Browsing (the net) is difficult due to the low speed. Even checking emails is a pain,” he said.

“Sometimes, loading a secure Google page takes a few long seconds,” he added.

Like others interviewed for this article, he did not want to be identified for fear of retribution.

Read more at: Phys.org

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