Taking the ‘noise’ out of protein data

Share via AddThis
Posted May 10, 2013

Mass spectrometry technologies offer the promise to comprehensively identify all of the proteins present in complexes, cells and tissues. A typical analysis generates large numbers of peptide (bits of protein) spectra. A search engine then compares the experimental peptide data to theoretical peptide sequences in a protein database and identifies each peptide in the sample. But the search engine often falsely identifies the peptides.

To combat search engine error, Andrew Link, Ph.D., associate professor of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, and colleagues have now designed and implemented a novel algorithm called De-Noise. They optimized De-Noise using data sets generated from various control and biological samples and run on different mass spectrometers.

They report in the Journal of Proteome Research that De-Noise improves peptide identification by SEQUEST, one of the most widely used search engines. They demonstrated that De-Noise performs better than other methods used to validate SEQUEST peptide matches. The De-Noise software is available upon request and can be easily implemented with other search engines.

Source: Vanderbilt University



45,610 science & technology articles

Categories

Our Articles (see all)

General News

Follow us

Facebook   Twitter   Pinterest   StumbleUpon   Plurk
Google+   Tumblr   Delicious   RSS   Newsletter via Email

Featured Video (see all)


Self-healing material could plug life-threatening holes in spacecraft
For astronauts living in space with objects zooming around them at 22,000 miles per hour like rogue super-bullets,…

Featured Image (see all)


Stark Beauty of Supersonic Shock Waves
Using a massive update to a 150-year-old German photography technique, NASA and the United States Air Force recently…